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ethanP

  • 3 years ago

Bacteria have many ways to survive, including developing mutations that provide them with a resistance to antibiotic medications. The standard practice of doctors is to administer a single antibiotic medication at a time to their patients. However, active infections are sometimes treated with a combination of several antibiotics given simultaneously to reduce the chances of bacteria developing antibiotic resistance. Why would giving multiple antibiotics at once be less likely to create a population of resistant bacteria?

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  1. jayanthjeeva
    • 3 years ago
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    because bacteria can able to mutate itself against only one type of antibiotic at one time.

  2. fall2012
    • 3 years ago
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    as @jayanthjeeva said, bacteria can only form resistance to one antibiotic at a time so if the bacteria forms a resistance to one antibiotic then the other can kill it.

  3. 123mudassar123
    • 3 years ago
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    agree with you 2

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