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sandy2413

  • 2 years ago

the factor 3m^3+5m^2-12m-20 help me plezz i have one day to finsh last resort

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  1. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    Ok, well I would start out by looking at the coefficients. Those are: 3, 5, -12, and -20. Do any of those have any factors in common? :)

  2. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    3 has -12in common and 5 has -20 in common

  3. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes, so if you group the ones that have something in common with each other together...

  4. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    what im lost

  5. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    If you group the monomials (3m^3 is one monomial) that have factors in common together...you're basically just grouping the 3-coefficient monomial with the -12 coefficient monomial, and the same for the 5 and -20 ones. Then you can divide out the factor that each group has in common.

  6. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    so for 3and -12 the grouping would be -4 and the grouping for 5 and -20 is -4 right?

  7. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes! So if you use the "reverse distributive property" on each group?

  8. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    reverse distributive property ?

  9. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    If you apply the distributive property, but reverse it. Instead of multiplying everything in parenthesis by the same thing, you divide "out" a common factor.

  10. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    so (3-20)4 like that

  11. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    um...Not quite. Do you know what a factor is? The GCF, or Greatest Common Factor of two numbers is the largest number that both of those numbers can both be evenly divide by. To put it simply, here's an example: the GCF of 40 and 8 is 8, because both 40 and 8 are evenly divisible y 8, with no remainders. Now fiind the GCF for 3 and -12 and the numbers 5 and -20

  12. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    3 and 5

  13. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    That's right. And now, can you group the numbers, and divide out the GCF for each group?

  14. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    so 3 in to 3 is one 3 in to 12 is 4 5 in to 5 is one 5 in to 20 is 4

  15. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes. Can you rewrite each group with parenthesis around the quotients? ( the 3 and 4 in the first group, for example)

  16. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    (3/3)=1 (3/12)=4 (5/5)=1 (5/20)=4

  17. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    XD ok, that's one way to write it. Here's more of what I was looking for: For the first group: 3m^3-12m is rewritten as 3 (m^3-4) Try the second group.

  18. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    5m^2-20 5(m^2-4

  19. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    so was that right

  20. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    cathyangs u there

  21. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    Sorry, just a family thing. That's right! (but remember to close the parenthesis) Now look back at the first one. What other factor do the two monomials inside the parenthesis have in common? (Big 'ol hint, it's a variable)

  22. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    m

  23. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    And you can pull that out of the parenthesis, right? :) So now, write the two groups added together (since they were two parts of the same equation in the beginning)

  24. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    3(m^3-4)5(m^2-20)

  25. sandy2413
    • 2 years ago
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    like this

  26. cathyangs
    • 2 years ago
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    *added together. you need a plus sign in there...also, double check each of the "groups" You forgot the m in the first one, and -20 should be something else in the second one ;)

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