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shivaniits

explain wave-particle duality....??.....and if possible please cite some good reputable sources!!

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. CliffSedge
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    Waves and particles are both man-made models to describe what we see in nature. Depending on how you measure something, it fits into one model or the other. I find Youtube videos featuring Feynman or Krauss to be a good start.

    • one year ago
  2. Jemurray3
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    On a macroscopic scale, we can distinguish waves, which are continuous, from particles, which are discrete, in a number of ways. For instance, particles are localized near a particular point in space, while waves are extended objects. Waves exhibit interference phenomena, while particles do not... so on and so forth. However, it becomes apparent when we look at experiments on the microscopic scale that these distinctions are no longer relevant. Objects sometimes have characteristics we would associate with waves, and other times exhibit characteristics we would associate with particles, depending on the situation. The so-called duality is a result of the inadequacy of our language more than anything else. For reference, see any elementary textbook on modern physics or quantum mechanics. Or just google it... the resources are available everywhere.

    • one year ago
  3. shivaniits
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    @CliffSedge could you provide me the links for feymann lectures discussing this point in detail...!!

    • one year ago
  4. Jemurray3
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kekayfI8Ii8

    • one year ago
  5. shivaniits
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    @Jemurray3 is this duality can only observed at microscopic level..?? as we have \[h/\lambda=mv or \lambda=h/mc\] this indicates that every particle could be considered as made up of this wave-particle duality...can this be plotted at macroscopic level...and thanks for the link....!!

    • one year ago
  6. Jemurray3
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    Yes. Qualitatively speaking, whether or not the wave-like character of a particle is apparent can be judged by the magnitude of the de Broglie wavelength. If we say that \[ \lambda = \frac{h}{p} \] then obviously for macroscopic objects lambda will be immeasurably small and the wavelike character of the particle will be unobservable. If, however, we are observing an electron (m ~ 10^-30 kg) then its de Broglie wavelength is a physically relevant quantity and the so-called duality becomes apparent.

    • one year ago
  7. shivaniits
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    @Jemurray3 sorry it was a busy day...well from the feymann lecture i got one thing that he quoted.." you can't relate the objects you study in quantum mechanics to the general things which you have come across..like a particle or typical wave on string..it behaves in it own way the quantum mechanical way.." and i think that yes if i start to think in that way then objects could be understood in that form!!...quantum mechanical form.....it was quite interesting!! is there any particular youtube channel providing those lecture..i actually googled out but could find out any particular channel for these videos...!!..yes thanks for suggesting me that link!!....it was really helpful!!

    • one year ago
  8. shivaniits
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    thanks everyone for their answers!!

    • one year ago
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