anonymous
  • anonymous
How is distance to a star calculated?
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
A couple of different ways, depending on the level of accuracy you're looking for. Observing the redshift of its galaxy and then using Hubble's law, or using optical parallax, or determining its size by other means and then calculating its distance by measuring its brightness are all possibilities.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Mostly by the amount of doppler redshift. Sometimes the starlight undergoes some absorption on its path (dust, u know is everywhere) , if we know the amount of absorption per distance - it is an additional clue
mayankdevnani
  • mayankdevnani
Nearby stars are measured with parallax

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mayankdevnani
  • mayankdevnani
@apple_pi
mayankdevnani
  • mayankdevnani
what can you say about @mathslover
mathslover
  • mathslover
as mentioned by mayank ... we can measure the nearby stars as : |dw:1346830698728:dw|
mathslover
  • mathslover
My knowledge is not so far good but you can go through out this : http://christiananswers.net/q-eden/star-distance.html
mathslover
  • mathslover
|dw:1346831064656:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
There are more options but the one that I know is already used in an answer above by mathslover. It's been measured with parallax, two measurement of the exact position of the star in the sky, 6 months apart (one side and from the other side of the earth). With more distant stars you should measure the brightness, I think.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry mr. @muhammad9t5 , YOU ARE MISTAKEN YOURSELF and MISLEAD OTHERS. NEVER HAS ANY COSMIC OBJECT HAS BEEN MEASURED BY ITS GRAVITY. 1 IT IS USUALLY IMPOSSIBLE TO SEPARATE ITS GRAVITY FROM OTHER FORCES (GRAVITATIONAL or other 2 FOR STARS - IT WILL NEVER BE POSSIBLE BECAUSE IT IS TOO WEAK. I suggest you think in terms of reality, real physics and not overfertile imagination....
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Mikael sorry sir.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well i am sorry for the harsh tone. hope u'll understand
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well, we're all here to learn, right ;)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Hmmm, ok but what about the ionosphere? How do we know how far the two viewpoints are from each other?

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