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apple_pi Group Title

How is distance to a star calculated?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. Jemurray3 Group Title
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    A couple of different ways, depending on the level of accuracy you're looking for. Observing the redshift of its galaxy and then using Hubble's law, or using optical parallax, or determining its size by other means and then calculating its distance by measuring its brightness are all possibilities.

    • one year ago
  2. Mikael Group Title
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    Mostly by the amount of doppler redshift. Sometimes the starlight undergoes some absorption on its path (dust, u know is everywhere) , if we know the amount of absorption per distance - it is an additional clue

    • one year ago
  3. mayankdevnani Group Title
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    Nearby stars are measured with parallax

    • one year ago
  4. mayankdevnani Group Title
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    @apple_pi

    • one year ago
  5. mayankdevnani Group Title
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    what can you say about @mathslover

    • one year ago
  6. mathslover Group Title
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    as mentioned by mayank ... we can measure the nearby stars as : |dw:1346830698728:dw|

    • one year ago
  7. mathslover Group Title
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    My knowledge is not so far good but you can go through out this : http://christiananswers.net/q-eden/star-distance.html

    • one year ago
  8. mathslover Group Title
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    |dw:1346831064656:dw|

    • one year ago
  9. youridebruijn Group Title
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    There are more options but the one that I know is already used in an answer above by mathslover. It's been measured with parallax, two measurement of the exact position of the star in the sky, 6 months apart (one side and from the other side of the earth). With more distant stars you should measure the brightness, I think.

    • one year ago
  10. Mikael Group Title
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    Sorry mr. @muhammad9t5 , YOU ARE MISTAKEN YOURSELF and MISLEAD OTHERS. NEVER HAS ANY COSMIC OBJECT HAS BEEN MEASURED BY ITS GRAVITY. 1 IT IS USUALLY IMPOSSIBLE TO SEPARATE ITS GRAVITY FROM OTHER FORCES (GRAVITATIONAL or other 2 FOR STARS - IT WILL NEVER BE POSSIBLE BECAUSE IT IS TOO WEAK. I suggest you think in terms of reality, real physics and not overfertile imagination....

    • one year ago
  11. muhammad9t5 Group Title
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    @Mikael sorry sir.

    • one year ago
  12. Mikael Group Title
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    Well i am sorry for the harsh tone. hope u'll understand

    • one year ago
  13. youridebruijn Group Title
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    Well, we're all here to learn, right ;)

    • one year ago
  14. apple_pi Group Title
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    Hmmm, ok but what about the ionosphere? How do we know how far the two viewpoints are from each other?

    • one year ago
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