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yakabush1

  • 3 years ago

2x 3/8

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  1. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    i got 480/80

  2. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    Is this \[2 \times \frac{3}{8}\]?

  3. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    yes

  4. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    helooooooooo

  5. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    1

  6. BifocalComb
    • 3 years ago
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    you have to multiply only the numerator by the three

  7. BifocalComb
    • 3 years ago
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    oops i meant two

  8. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    Just remember that fractions are really the amount on top (numerator) divided by the amount on bottom (denominator). One way to look at it is to turn the fraction \[\frac{3}{8}\] into\[3\div8\], so you have \[2\times3\div8\]Then solve the multiplications and divisions separately\[(2\times3)\div(8)=(6)\div(8)\]and then make it look like a fraction again:\[\frac{6}{8}\]. That can be simplified, though. Or, look at the "2" like this:\[\frac{2}{1}\], and multiply numerators together and denominators together. It's the same thing. Then\[\frac{2}{1}\times\frac{3}{8}=\frac{2*3}{1*8}=\frac{6}{8}\].

  9. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    Those are two ways to think about multiplying fractions!

  10. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    Sorry I took so long!

  11. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    ok thanks

  12. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    can u help me in one more

  13. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    Can you simplify it? Divide top and bottom by 2! Some teachers require simplification...

  14. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    Possibly! I have to go soon! You post it, and I'll see if I can help!

  15. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    1 1/2 divided by 3

  16. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    If it's very similar, I hope that you can do it on your own, or we can do it together!

  17. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    So,\[1\frac{1}{2}\div3\]

  18. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    i got 1 2/20

  19. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    That is different!

  20. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    That's not quite right, but we'll get there! \[1\frac{1}{2}=1+\frac{1}{2}\], right?

  21. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    yeah

  22. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    and 1, as a fraction, is any number over itself, like\[1=\frac{2}{2}\]right? Then you can look at \[1+\frac{1}{2}\]like\[\frac{2}{2}+\frac{1}{2}=\frac{3}{2}\]

  23. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    \[1\frac{1}{2}=\frac{3}{2}\]

  24. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    thanks men

  25. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    \[=3\div2\]

  26. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    That's just the fraction... You still have to divide by 3.

  27. yakabush1
    • 3 years ago
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    1.5

  28. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\frac{3}{2}=3\div2\] I did that again.. Similar to what we did before! Fraction to division... Really the same thing. Anyway, \[1\frac{1}{2}\div3=\frac{3}{2}\div3=3\div2\div3=3\div3\div2=1\div2\] See what I did there? And, if you need the fraction, I trust you can find it!

  29. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    It's just lucky that \[3\div3=1\], because it made our problem easier! :)

  30. BifocalComb
    • 3 years ago
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    Eric if you want I'll take over from here if you have to go..

  31. theEric
    • 3 years ago
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    Thanks! I trust you can help with this question and any others! :) I do have to get going. Take care, all!

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