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Mello

  • 3 years ago

Find all the whole number values of n, that would make the following statement true. (3n+9)/(n+1)

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  1. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    means answer should be 0

  2. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    @Mello

  3. Mello
    • 3 years ago
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    Thanks, but there was a set of numbers on the example question. 0 works, what else?

  4. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    (3n+9)/(n+1) it is wholly divided....

  5. Mello
    • 3 years ago
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    What do you mean by, wholly divided?

  6. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    means the remainder is zero(0)

  7. Mello
    • 3 years ago
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    Right. But I'm pretty sure there are other values of n, that also leaves a remainder of 0

  8. chihiroasleaf
    • 3 years ago
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    n = 2 ?

  9. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    no one whole no. can be fully satisfied with n

  10. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    @Mello

  11. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    there would be some integers..

  12. chihiroasleaf
    • 3 years ago
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    I think \[n = 3k-1, k \in \mathbb{N}\]

  13. Mello
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh I got it, 0; 1; 2; 5; -2; -3; -4; -7 Heh, thanks for your help :)

  14. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    thanx for who??

  15. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    @Mello

  16. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    are you there??

  17. chihiroasleaf
    • 3 years ago
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    if n is whole number, so negative integers can't be the solution, since whole number starts at 0,1,2,3,....

  18. mukushla
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\frac{3n+9}{n+1}=\frac{3n+3+6}{n+1}=3+\frac{6}{n+1}\]so \(n+1|6\) and we have\[n+1=\pm1,\pm2,\pm3,\pm6\]

  19. chihiroasleaf
    • 3 years ago
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    @mukushla are negative numbers also the solutions? since the question ask for n to be whole number

  20. mukushla
    • 3 years ago
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    u r right negatives are not solution

  21. mukushla
    • 3 years ago
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    only solutions are \(n=0,1,2,5\)

  22. Mello
    • 3 years ago
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    @mayankdevnani everyone who helped. @chihiroasleaf @mukushla Sorry, I translated this from another language. I think the correct term was integer. Thanks again to everyone for your input!

  23. mukushla
    • 3 years ago
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    np :)

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