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lgbasallote

  • 3 years ago

They say that adding "-ing" to a word turns it into a verb. Then how come "interesting" is an adjective, and not a verb? Also, why is "interesting" the only adjective that ends with "-ing" that even if you omit "-ing" the word still makes sense?

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  1. jazy
    • 3 years ago
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    Sometimes there are words that ignore the English grammar rules. *caring* could also be an adjective depending the context.

  2. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    interesting is never a verb

  3. jazy
    • 3 years ago
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    True... I'm not a big fan of grammar rules in general.

  4. Lethal
    • 3 years ago
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    http://www.myenglishteacher.net/gerunds.html

  5. Lethal
    • 3 years ago
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    There are some rules at the bottom that may or may not help.

  6. sasogeek
    • 3 years ago
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    "They say that adding "-ing" to a word turns it into a verb" .... who is "They"?

  7. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    @Lethal this isn't a gerund. Gerunds are words that look like verb but function as nouns. However, this does not look like a verb, and it functions as an adjective, not noun.

  8. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    @sasogeek it's an expression

  9. sasogeek
    • 3 years ago
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    oh well

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