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moongazer

Could someone explain to me how to graph of all inverse trigo functions and its properties? or can you give me a website that can help :) Thanks! :)

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. kuraby
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    wolfram alpha can graph functions for you

    • one year ago
  2. moongazer
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    I already know how to graph the graph trigo functions, but not the inverse. :)

    • one year ago
  3. ash2326
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    Hi @moongazer this might help http://www.intmath.com/analytic-trigonometry/7-inverse-trigo-functions.php

    • one year ago
  4. kuraby
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    Nice website ash. it is like replacing the x values with the y values.

    • one year ago
  5. moongazer
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    @ash2326 I already saw that awhile ago. But I can't understand why it works. when you make y=x it gives you the inverse graph.

    • one year ago
  6. moongazer
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    How do you also find the other properties? like the period, amplitude, phase shift etc.

    • one year ago
  7. kuraby
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    That is true. given a graph x = siny you get the sine curve going up the y-axis.|dw:1347168918572:dw| ignore faults in sketch. But by the vertical line test this graph would not be a proper function. so we have to put boundaries. That graph can only by a proper function when x = -1 up to x = 1.

    • one year ago
  8. kuraby
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    So looking at inverse sine, or arcsine: y = arcsinex |dw:1347169164647:dw| the domain of x is -1 to 1, and the range of y is -pi/2 to pi/2

    • one year ago
  9. moongazer
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    does it have a period also? or amplitude?

    • one year ago
  10. kuraby
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    The function does not repeat, so no period. no amplitude in the traditional sense. amplitude refers to the regular sine functions that do repeat. If you are referring to the distance in x from the function to the y-axis, same amplitude as y=sinx.

    • one year ago
  11. kuraby
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    Not the best of descriptions, but inverse functions tend to be used to find angles. Any reasons on why you would need inverse properties?

    • one year ago
  12. moongazer
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    it is our homework :) it says summarize the graphs ans properties of trigonometric functions. why is when you want to graph the inverse, you make it y=x?

    • one year ago
  13. kuraby
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    concept of using y = x is to draw a mirror or reciprocal of a given graph. One reason for doing so with trig functions is to find some degree given a length. Usually the question goes what is y= sinx where x is a given degree and y is the desired length. Now the question would be "for what length y does degree x give for function sine? so instead of just saying switch y with x, ask the question: if y = sin(x) then y = sin (?) when y is given. The graphing is to portray all possible values of (?) when y is given. then y becomes our independent variable while (?) becomes our dependent variable. drawing the results becomes a mirrored graph of sin(x) when reflected off the line y = x. as so:|dw:1347173789922:dw|

    • one year ago
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