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Lime

  • 3 years ago

What is another name for plane Z?

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  1. andriod09
    • 3 years ago
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    plain Z is the plane that is width basicly if looking at a 3d figure. its like this: |dw:1347464584819:dw|

  2. Lime
    • 3 years ago
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  3. Lime
    • 3 years ago
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    X has to be involved, correct?

  4. andriod09
    • 3 years ago
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    yea

  5. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    you have drawn a left handed coordinate system

  6. andriod09
    • 3 years ago
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    i drew a right handed cord system. I did it the tight way. im homeschooled.

  7. Lime
    • 3 years ago
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    Then I would say XTV? XSL doesn't connect and neither does ZXL.

  8. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    or are you refering to the complex plane?

  9. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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  10. Lime
    • 3 years ago
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    I am referring to my figure. Not sure why we have a left-handed Cartesian plane up there.

  11. Shi
    • 3 years ago
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    I think you would call it the XLV plane, as it is defined by those three noncolinear points

  12. Lime
    • 3 years ago
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    Again, I'm guessing XTV? XLV is not a provided answer, but I do understand that.

  13. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    the plane Z can be described by two vectors in it. x is on vector , the vector perpendicular to x is V

  14. Shi
    • 3 years ago
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    Ah i think XTV works also, were there multiple choices given?

  15. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    does T go through the plane ?

  16. Lime
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes. plane ZXL plane XTV plane SLT plane XSL

  17. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    oh wait i see now, T is the point when the intersection occur

  18. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    i thought they were vectors

  19. Shi
    • 3 years ago
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    kk then I believe XTV is correct, three points that do not lie on the same line define a plane

  20. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    yeah

  21. Lime
    • 3 years ago
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    I thank the both of you. Now only if OP would let me hand out multiple medals..

  22. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    the three points had to be from this set LTXV

  23. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    but not the combination XTL as these point are in a line

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