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ShotGunGirl

  • 2 years ago

Namelss' Riddle: Arrange the numbers 1 3 4 6 in an equation to make 24. Each number must be used once and only once. You can use any number and combination of addition, subtraction, multiplication or division operators, and brackets to enforce an order of evaluation. e.g. 4 + ((3 - 1) x 6), wrong result, but valid form. No tricks: - It's 24 in decimal - Each number is separate, you can't use 1 and 4 together to make fourteen etc. - It's not a word game where 24 means "to for" or "a day" or anything like that.

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  1. gohangoku58
    • 2 years ago
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    because they were grandfather-father-son.

  2. ShotGunGirl
    • 2 years ago
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    Wow it took me like and hour to figure this out at first. Good job. Answer(as mentioned):one of the 'fathers' is also a grandfather. Therefore the other father is both a son and a father to the grandson. In other words, the one father is both a son and a father.

  3. ShotGunGirl
    • 2 years ago
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    Thank you for the medal<3

  4. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    Arrange the numbers 1 3 4 6 in an equation to make 24. Each number must be used once and only once. You can use any number and combination of addition, subtraction, multiplication or division operators, and brackets to enforce an order of evaluation. e.g. 4 + ((3 - 1) x 6), wrong result, but valid form. No tricks: - It's 24 in decimal - Each number is separate, you can't use 1 and 4 together to make fourteen etc. - It's not a word game where 24 means "to for" or "a day" or anything like that.

  5. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    Are exponents allowed?

  6. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    nope

  7. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    only standard operators.. no algebra either :)

  8. andriod09
    • 2 years ago
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    Can you an operation more than once?

  9. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    no

  10. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    well yes you would hav to

  11. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    sorry misread

  12. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    yall want me to just post the answer? i gotta leave soon :)

  13. andriod09
    • 2 years ago
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    no the answer is

  14. andriod09
    • 2 years ago
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    sure i dont got the answer

  15. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    I'm pretty stumped too.

  16. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    6(1-(3/4) = 24

  17. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    ?

  18. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
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    u forgot 1 /

  19. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
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    6/(1-(3/4) = 24

  20. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    Bah, I knew there had to be a fraction in there . . .

  21. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
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    6/(1-(3/4)) = 24

  22. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    oh yeah.. missed the first divisor.. thanks hartnn

  23. andriod09
    • 2 years ago
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    hart is right. wow.

  24. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    Didn't think to subtract from one yet, though. Good one!

  25. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    learnd that in my ics class for operators in java haha

  26. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
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    that was good one @Nameless

  27. Nameless
    • 2 years ago
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    thanks, and thanks for the help if u helped me :) see yall soon

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