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swissgirl

  • 3 years ago

Hey is anyone familiar with 4 digit chopping arithmetic?

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  1. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Doesn't sound familiar, but I might know what you mean by another name.

  2. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    Like at what point do I chop?

  3. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    Like you only have four digits after the decimal

  4. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    Do I chop at the end or at every point that there is more than 4 digits after the decimal?

  5. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Do you mean rounding, truncating, or determining significant figures?

  6. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    def not rounding

  7. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    idk what the others r

  8. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Sounds like you mean truncating then. Truncate = chop off.

  9. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    ohhhh lol Ya like when do i chop off?

  10. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    If you want your answer to only have 4 digits, then count four digits starting from the left, keep those four and get rid of all the rest.

  11. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Example. 123.456789 truncated to four digits = 123.4 If you want to truncate to a particular place value, say, the ten-thousandths place, then 123.4567 is truncated at the fourth digit after the decimal point.

  12. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    yes but my question is as follows like do u chop off like at any point while u r solving or only once u have solved the whole equation?

  13. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    Like do u contiously chop off?

  14. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Ah, only round or truncate at the very end of your calculations! That is very important.

  15. Agent47
    • 3 years ago
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    no, only after u finish solving

  16. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    THANNNKKKSSSS lol

  17. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    That is a matter of significant figures then. If you round or truncate in the middle of your calculations you'll get round-off error and all sorts of other nasty business.

  18. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    ya i figured so i just had to dbl check

  19. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Check this example: 12.34567 times 2.98765 = 36.88454098... Truncated at the fourth digit is 36.88 But if you 'chop' first then, 12.34 times 2.987 = 36.85958, which would be chopped to 36.85. That is off from the correct answer by 3/100.

  20. swissgirl
    • 3 years ago
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    Thanks

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