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Can anyone read old English?:)

Mathematics
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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old people
The soyle yeldeth, and may be made to yelde, all the severall comodities of Europe, and of all kingdomes, domynions, and territories that England tradeth with, that by trade of marchandize cometh into this realme.
http://college.cengage.com/history/ayers_primary_sources/england_title_hakluyt.htm

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Other answers:

i must really be old, because i can actually read that can you?
Nope.. :( 16 and lame.
Old English is just the different spellings in pronunciation of words that were used before more formal, standardized versions of English came about. Here's the translation: The soil yields, and may be made to yield, all the several comodities of Europe, and of all kingdoms, dominions, and territories that England trades with, that by trade of merchandise come into this realm.
How about for this @Hero ? 2. The passage thither and home is neither to longe nor to shorte, but easie, and to be made twise in the yere.
Basically saying that the way back home to England isn't that long, and can be made twice a year?
Bingo
5 and 6...
5. And where England nowe for certen hundreth yeres last passed, by the peculiar comoditie of wolles, and of later yeres by clothinge of the same, hath raised it selfe from meaner state to greater wealthe and moche higher honour, mighte, and power then before, to the equallinge of the princes of the same to the greatest pontentates of this parte of the worlde; it cometh nowe so to passe, that by the greate endevour of the increase of the trade of wolles in Spain and in the West Indies, nowe daily more and more muliplienge, that the wolles of England, and the clothe made of the same, will become base, and every day more base than other; which, prudently weyed, yt behoveth this realme, yf it meane not it returne to former olde meanes and basnes, but to stande in present and late former honour, glorye, and force, and not negligently and sleepingly to slyde into beggery, to foresee and to plante at Norumbega or some like place, were it not for a ny thing els but for the hope of the vent of our contynueinge naturall comoditie of this realme. And effectually pursueinge that course, wee shall not onely finde on that tracte of lande, and especially in that firme northwarde (to whome warme clothe shalbe righte wellcome), an ample vente, but also shall, from the north side of that firme, finde oute knowen and unknowen ilandes and domynions replenishd with people that may fully vent the aboundaunce of that our comoditie, that els will in fewe yeres waxe of none or of small value by forreine aboundaunce, &c.; so as by this enterprice wee shall shonne the ymmynent mischefe hanging over our heades, that els must nedes fall upon th realme, without breache of peace or sworde drawen againste this realm by any forreine state; and not offer our auncient riches to scornefull neighbors at home, nor sell the same in effecte for nothinge, as wee shall shortly, if presently it be not provided for. The increase of the wolles of Spaine and America is of high pollicie, with greate desire of our overthrowe, endeavored; and the goodnes of the forren wolles our people will not enter into the consideration of, nor will not beleve aughte, they be so sotted with opinion of their owne; and yf it be not foresene and some such place of vent provided, farewell the goodd state of all degrees in this realme.
Yes, I know. You just have to interpret the words based on their context: wolles = wool moche = much for example
slyde = slide
potentates = potential
Not difficult at all
It's not my work, and I'm in the middle of studying, or else I would have done it.
I'll just tell him to stop being lazy
lol
Actually, I look at Old English the same way I look at writing with very bad grammar.

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