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abdul_shabeer

  • 3 years ago

What is a plane?

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  1. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    Is it composed of many points?

  2. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    In Mathematics

  3. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    here's an example of a plane |dw:1347602928018:dw|

  4. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    here's another one that im sure you're familiar of |dw:1347602961138:dw| what do you notice?

  5. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    Is plane composed of points?

  6. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    yes...in a sense...it is

  7. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    however, the more exact way of defining it is that it is composed of lines

  8. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    A plane has area?

  9. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    area, perimeter, length, width, etc.

  10. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    Which means a point has area...

  11. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    uhh no....

  12. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    Then how does a plane have area?

  13. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    do you know what "area" is?

  14. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    space occupied?

  15. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    that's volume

  16. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1347603254688:dw| that is the area...it is the amount of space *covered* by a *closed figure*

  17. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    a point is NOT a closed figure

  18. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    Then how does collection of points make a plane?

  19. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    collection of points => line collection of lines => plane

  20. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    Line is collection of points, therefore a plane is a collection of points.

  21. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    yes..now you got it

  22. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    That's not my doubt..

  23. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    A plane is collection of lines or points and a plane has area. Which means a point should have area.

  24. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    no

  25. jreem
    • 3 years ago
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    A geometric object defined by three points not on the same line. Any more than three points and they do not necessarily define a plane. A point has zero length and zero area.

  26. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    Why?

  27. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    area only happens to two-dimensional figures

  28. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    area = length x width <==two dimensions

  29. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    a point is dimensionless

  30. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    Then why does a plane have area?

  31. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    because a plane is two dimensional

  32. Chlorophyll
    • 3 years ago
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    A plane is made up from at least 2 crossed lines!

  33. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    How can we make two dimension from zero dimension?

  34. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    plane = two-dimensional area = two-dimensional therefore... plane has area point = 0 dimenison area = two dimension therefore...point does NOT have area

  35. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    @abdul_shabeer can you not make 1 out of 0?

  36. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    or 2 out of 0

  37. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    all you have to do is add

  38. jreem
    • 3 years ago
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    Any two points, both dimension 0, have a distance between them, which is dimension 1. Extrapolate to higher dimensions.

  39. abdul_shabeer
    • 3 years ago
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    @jreem What is that distance composed of?

  40. jreem
    • 3 years ago
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    Points. An infinity of them. That's how we can add zero's and get to a non-zero number.

  41. Directrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Plane is one of at least 3 *undefined* terms in Euclidean Geometry. Think of it as a flat surface extending infinitely far. A plane has no length, width, perimeter, area or depth. It contains lines, points, rays, and so forth.

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