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coolaidd

What is the approximate value of the function at x = -3?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. coolaidd
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    • one year ago
  2. henpen
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    How high is the line (measured using the y-axis) over the horizontal point (x=) -3?

    • one year ago
  3. coolaidd
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    5?

    • one year ago
  4. CliffSedge
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    He's saying look above x=-3.

    • one year ago
  5. henpen
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    |dw:1347647720757:dw|

    • one year ago
  6. coolaidd
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    well up 1 from -3?

    • one year ago
  7. coolaidd
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    @henpen ??

    • one year ago
  8. CliffSedge
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    It's slightly higher than 1.

    • one year ago
  9. theEric
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    Somewhere around there! It looks closest to the y=1 line. To me it looks like 1.2 or somewhere around 1.2, but your teacher may want you to stick to the drawn lines for accuracy. I don't kno! But it is definately about 1. There's no way to konw exactly what it is without knowing how each horizontal value (such as -3) determines the vertical value (like the one we are trying to estimate).

    • one year ago
  10. theEric
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    CliffSedge made a good point, saying that it's greater than 1. It's true to say that this mystery value is between 1 and 2.

    • one year ago
  11. coolaidd
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    so is there a definite answer i can give?

    • one year ago
  12. CliffSedge
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    theEric's guess of 1.2 is pretty good. I really doubt it's higher than 1.3 or 1.4.

    • one year ago
  13. henpen
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    The whole point of an approximation is that you DON'T give a definite answer. Guess.

    • one year ago
  14. theEric
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    Has your teacher gave you any guidelines for estimating? and thank you!

    • one year ago
  15. coolaidd
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    nope :/

    • one year ago
  16. henpen
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    Really, I think you're over complicating. It looks sort of like it could be in the vicinity of 1.2 ish. Good enough.

    • one year ago
  17. coolaidd
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    thanks guys!

    • one year ago
  18. CliffSedge
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    There is a definite (exact) answer to give if you had the equation. You can make a good guess and be definite about how uncertain you are.

    • one year ago
  19. theEric
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    Sometimes teachers will want you to estimate a certain way, so that there is only one answer, and that might be the case here. So, in that sense there may be a definate answer where there is no definate value. I'd say just guess about 1.2! That would be what all my teachers would've liked, I think!

    • one year ago
  20. CliffSedge
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    It looks like the equation would be \[y=\frac{-1}{(x-3)}+1\] If you want to get it exactly.

    • one year ago
  21. CliffSedge
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    One of the important things about estimation is that you don't want to claim more precision than you actually have. In this situation, with that scale, you can't really get any better than to estimate to ±½ or ±¼ at best. You can definitely do better than rounding to the nearest whole number, so go out to the tenths place and you'll be fine.

    • one year ago
  22. theEric
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    CliffSedge proposed an equation that seems right! Notably, the asemptote is at x=2, and his formula yields y=2 at x=2 which looks pretty exact in the picture.

    • one year ago
  23. theEric
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    Again, CliffSedge made a great point: about accuracy this time!

    • one year ago
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