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imron07

How to insert new line, please :D

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. ParthKohli
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    Use "\\". ``` 1\\ 2 \\ 3 \\ 4 ``` yields\[1 \\ 2 \\ 3 \\ 4\]

    • one year ago
  2. ParthKohli
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    Similarly, you may start a new \(\LaTeX\) bracket again. So, ``` \[1\]\[2\]\[3\]\[4\] ``` yields\[1\]\[2\]\[3\]\[4\]

    • one year ago
  3. ParthKohli
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    Notice how \\ is much more convenient if you want to use lesser spacing between two lines. :)

    • one year ago
  4. imron07
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    Thank you @ParthKohli :)

    • one year ago
  5. ParthKohli
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    You're welcome :)

    • one year ago
  6. imron07
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    I was always disturbed by lengthy spacing between eqs before.

    • one year ago
  7. ParthKohli
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    Me too! Another tip for you. ``` Right: \[x + 3 = 8\]\[\implies x = 8 - 3 = 5\] ``` The above is better since this doesn't do a lot of spacing between two equations. Here's what you should do. ``` Wrong: \[x + 3 = 8\] \[\implies x = 8 - 3 = 5 \] ```

    • one year ago
  8. hartnn
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    \(hi\\hello\\testing\\1\\2\\3\)

    • one year ago
  9. ParthKohli
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    Let's compare the outputs of both 'right' and the 'wrong'. Right -\[x + 3 = 8\]\[\implies x = 8 - 3 = 5\] Wrong -\[x + 3 = 8 \] \[\implies x = 8 - 3 = 5\]

    • one year ago
  10. ParthKohli
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    Another good way is the following: ``` x + 3 = 8 \\ \implies x = 8 - 3 = 5 ```

    • one year ago
  11. imron07
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    Wow, thanks for the bonus tip. What about making equals aligned. Is there a way?

    • one year ago
  12. KingGeorge
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    To make equals aligned, it's a little bit weirder. There are two ways that stand out to me. 1: `f(x)=4x+7(x+3) \\ f(x)=4x+7x+21 \\ f(x)=11x+21` which outputs\[f(x)=4x+7(x+3) \\ f(x)=4x+7x+21 \\ f(x)=11x+21\]The downside to this, is that you always have to have the same stuff before the equals sign. 2. `\begin{aligned} f(x)=32 &=4x+7(x+3) \\ &=4x+7x+21 \\ &=11x+21 \\ 32-21&=11x \\ 11&=11x \\ x&=1 \end{aligned}` which outputs \[\begin{aligned} f(x)=32 &=4x+7(x+3) \\ &=4x+7x+21 \\ &=11x+21 \\ 32-21&=11x \\ 11&=11x \\ x&=1 \end{aligned}\]You start with `\begin{aligned}` and end with `\end{aligned}`. To start a new line, you use `\\` and wherever you put the `&` sign, that's where it lines things up. In this case, I put them in front of the equals signs. This method gives you much more flexibility, but it takes longer to type.

    • one year ago
  13. imron07
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    Yaay, thanks @KingGeorge !

    • one year ago
  14. KingGeorge
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    You're welcome.

    • one year ago
  15. ParthKohli
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    That's something new I learned; I've heard only of `\begin{align} `.

    • one year ago
  16. KingGeorge
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    Technically speaking, they're almost the same, but you should use "aligned" if you're working in a second environment. So if you have an equation environment, you need to use "aligned" to align your lines. In the standard math mode, I think "align" is technically more correct, but they have the same effect in math mode, so I just always use "aligned."

    • one year ago
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