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DIKHUNELOG

  • 3 years ago

what is the intergral of 0?

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  1. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    better yet, let me convince you what is the physical representation of the integral from x=a to x=b ?

  2. erica.d
    • 3 years ago
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    i don't know much about integrals but i know they represent sum of anything so how could we sum up zero

  3. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    that is one convincing argument^

  4. honey26
    • 3 years ago
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    There is nothing like integral of zero.You should mention with respect to which you are integrating it.If it is the integration of 0 with respect to ,say some dt,then its value is a constant.in the case of integral of zero with anything gives us a constant.

  5. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    the integral of zero is asking about the area under the curve f(x)=0 what is the area under the line y=0 ?

  6. erica.d
    • 3 years ago
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    @TuringTest is it ...lol..i am in 9th grade..but love sign of integral lol

  7. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    Well your explanation is quite valid :) As I side note, I always loved the symbol of the integral as well ;)

  8. erica.d
    • 3 years ago
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    :) thanks :)

  9. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    @honey26 your explanation is not right, you are describing the integral of 1

  10. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    the integral of zero has a meaning: the area under the curve of y=0, or the sum of all the y values in some interval as @erica.d said, which is 0+0+0+0+0....=0 so there are two ways to see that the answer is zero

  11. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry, what I said is only for definite integrals, I think I see your point now @honey26

  12. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    my apologies

  13. honey26
    • 3 years ago
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    yah,it is true that integral of zero means area under the line y=0 but indefinite integral of 1 with respect to dt gives us t but not a constant,right.

  14. erica.d
    • 3 years ago
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    does indefinite integral represent sum @TuringTest i guess No :)

  15. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    yes it does represent a sum actually the symbol you love so much \[\int\]is in fact a medieval S that stands for "summa"

  16. erica.d
    • 3 years ago
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    oh thanks for this nugget of wisdom ..... :D

  17. honey26
    • 3 years ago
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    indefinite integral is also a sum but it has no limits like definite integral.

  18. erica.d
    • 3 years ago
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    guys i need to learn it more ::( i feel so stupid here

  19. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    ...and that is why the indefinite integral of 0 can be a constant, because \[\int0dx\]asks "what function is 0 the derivative of?" the answer is any constant, (or in multivarible terms, any variable that does not depend on x)

  20. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    if you are in 9th grade @erica.d you are way ahead of where I was back then. I was busy failing algebra, I had to go to summer school ;)

  21. erica.d
    • 3 years ago
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    he he thanks :) i am just curious to solve those complex equation that i have seen on TV

  22. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    you will, I'm sure :D

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