Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

DIKHUNELOG Group Title

what is the intergral of 0?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

  • This Question is Open
  1. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    better yet, let me convince you what is the physical representation of the integral from x=a to x=b ?

    • 2 years ago
  2. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i don't know much about integrals but i know they represent sum of anything so how could we sum up zero

    • 2 years ago
  3. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    that is one convincing argument^

    • 2 years ago
  4. honey26 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    There is nothing like integral of zero.You should mention with respect to which you are integrating it.If it is the integration of 0 with respect to ,say some dt,then its value is a constant.in the case of integral of zero with anything gives us a constant.

    • 2 years ago
  5. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the integral of zero is asking about the area under the curve f(x)=0 what is the area under the line y=0 ?

    • 2 years ago
  6. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @TuringTest is it ...lol..i am in 9th grade..but love sign of integral lol

    • 2 years ago
  7. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Well your explanation is quite valid :) As I side note, I always loved the symbol of the integral as well ;)

    • 2 years ago
  8. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    :) thanks :)

    • 2 years ago
  9. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    @honey26 your explanation is not right, you are describing the integral of 1

    • 2 years ago
  10. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the integral of zero has a meaning: the area under the curve of y=0, or the sum of all the y values in some interval as @erica.d said, which is 0+0+0+0+0....=0 so there are two ways to see that the answer is zero

    • 2 years ago
  11. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    sorry, what I said is only for definite integrals, I think I see your point now @honey26

    • 2 years ago
  12. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    my apologies

    • 2 years ago
  13. honey26 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yah,it is true that integral of zero means area under the line y=0 but indefinite integral of 1 with respect to dt gives us t but not a constant,right.

    • 2 years ago
  14. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    does indefinite integral represent sum @TuringTest i guess No :)

    • 2 years ago
  15. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    yes it does represent a sum actually the symbol you love so much \[\int\]is in fact a medieval S that stands for "summa"

    • 2 years ago
  16. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    oh thanks for this nugget of wisdom ..... :D

    • 2 years ago
  17. honey26 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    indefinite integral is also a sum but it has no limits like definite integral.

    • 2 years ago
  18. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    guys i need to learn it more ::( i feel so stupid here

    • 2 years ago
  19. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    ...and that is why the indefinite integral of 0 can be a constant, because \[\int0dx\]asks "what function is 0 the derivative of?" the answer is any constant, (or in multivarible terms, any variable that does not depend on x)

    • 2 years ago
  20. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    if you are in 9th grade @erica.d you are way ahead of where I was back then. I was busy failing algebra, I had to go to summer school ;)

    • 2 years ago
  21. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    he he thanks :) i am just curious to solve those complex equation that i have seen on TV

    • 2 years ago
  22. TuringTest Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    you will, I'm sure :D

    • 2 years ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.