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math_crasher

  • 3 years ago

what is the geometric mean of 3 and 7?

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  1. RiOT
    • 3 years ago
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    To find the mean of something, you add the terms and then divide by the amount of them. So, they equal 10 and there are two of them. 10/2 = 5. The mean should be 5.

  2. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    Square root of product

  3. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    I thought I multiply the two and find the square root?

  4. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    I repeat Square root of product

  5. RiOT
    • 3 years ago
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    Don't listen to me... O_O I may very well be wrong.

  6. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    so I should square root 21?

  7. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes

  8. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    but that just gets a weird number

  9. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    If it was 3 numbers, then cube root of 3 multiplied together....

  10. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    ah i see

  11. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    It's just a different kind of average....

  12. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    So would I do something like 2*square root of the product?

  13. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    Nope, just sqrt 21, that's the GM

  14. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    so I just leave it at square root 21?

  15. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    Yup

  16. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    why's that?

  17. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    What do you mean?

  18. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    why do i leave it at \[\sqrt{21}\] ?

  19. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    Is there something wrong with sqrt 21 ?

  20. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    don't I have to actually sqaure root it and make it X *\[\sqrt{X}\]

  21. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    or something like that?

  22. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    I don't understand, the square root of 21 is roughly 4.5825, unless you are asked to give a decimal approximation, just leave it as sqrt 21

  23. math_crasher
    • 3 years ago
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    oh ok thanks

  24. estudier
    • 3 years ago
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    ur welcome

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