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waheguru

  • 2 years ago

I have a question about naming molecular compounds we usually add a ide in the ending for the second elelemtn but what if there is only one element for example 03 would it be trioxygen or trioxide

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  1. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    So do I add the ide as the ending for oxygen if it is the only element or do i make a trioxygen

  2. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    It would be Trioxide of ________ if you were talking about some compound

  3. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    It is a compound with is self

  4. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    three oxygens

  5. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    Although, if you want to talk about \(\large \text{O}_3\), it would be trioxygen

  6. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    yes 03,

  7. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    So trioxygen would be correct and for my previous post, it should be _____ trioxide, my bad.

  8. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    So its tripxygen because there is only one compound right?

  9. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes, in this case we could simply call it ozone ;x

  10. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    But say it was CO then it would be carbon oxide right

  11. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes

  12. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    Monoxide*

  13. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    Just clarifying, for any compound that is with it self does not have the ending of ide but if it with a different compound then is does

  14. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    Mono - 1 Di - 2 Tri - 3 Tetra - 4 Penta - 5 and so on.

  15. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    yes

  16. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    What do you mean?

  17. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    So if an element is bonded with it self we dont add the ide but when its bonded with another we add the ide

  18. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    Just for some on the elements, not all elements are like this

  19. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    It's just a language thing, we add the ide because gen doesn't sound right sometimes

  20. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    n2 would be dinitrogen right?

  21. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    Yep

  22. waheguru
    • 2 years ago
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    Thank You!

  23. zepp
    • 2 years ago
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    Welcome! :)

  24. Carl_Pham
    • 2 years ago
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    There's a modern trend to naming allotropes of elements where there are identifiable molecules as if they were compounds, hence O2 is "dioxygen" and N2 is "dinitrogen" and so forth. But few chemists actually use those names. To most working chemists, O2 is "oxygen" and N2 is "nitrogen," because that's how the elements naturally occur. If you actually had some O you would call it "atomic oxygen" or something like that, because it's a rare and strange beast. It also runs into a little trouble with some elements, e.g. sulfur naturally occurs as S8 and phosphorus as P4, and saying "octasulfur" and "tetraphosphorus" sounds...well, strange. Then we get into the fact that one of the allotropes of carbon is C60....

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