Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

erica.d Group Title

if jane walks 15m straight and then she turns left and walks for 5 m after that she walks another 3 m towards right then how far is she from the point of start? i am finding it tough to picturize this ..

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @across

    • 2 years ago
  2. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @cwrw238

    • 2 years ago
  3. across Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    You have to use the Pythagorean theorem.

    • 2 years ago
  4. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i know that but how to plot this or draw this

    • 2 years ago
  5. tyteen4a03 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The diagram you're looking for is this:|dw:1348068681247:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  6. tyteen4a03 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Excuse my drawing, but you get the idea.

    • 2 years ago
  7. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @tyteen4a03 thanks...now what?

    • 2 years ago
  8. tyteen4a03 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Putting this in the coordinate plane, assuming that the starting point is the origin, the final point would be (-5, 18). Now plug these numbers into the distance formula \(\sqrt{(x2-x1)^2 + (y2-y1)^2}\) and you get the answer.

    • 2 years ago
  9. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @across if i'll join the two end points ..still i am unable to find the distance ...

    • 2 years ago
  10. across Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    If you join the two ends, you will end up with a right triangle that has a base of length 5 and a height of length 15+3.

    • 2 years ago
  11. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1348069046132:dw| ?? @across

    • 2 years ago
  12. across Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    |dw:1348069089040:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  13. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    that's amazing....@across you are genius :) thanks a lot

    • 2 years ago
  14. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1348069219200:dw| i was doing it this way...and i guess there is no need to plot it on graph and point out coordinates ..... @across thanks alot again

    • 2 years ago
  15. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i wish i could give you all the medals lol

    • 2 years ago
  16. tyteen4a03 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @erica.d One thing about mathematics is that there are many solution to the same problem. The Distance Formula, for example, is useful when you only know the starting and the ending point (imagine your question, but you're only given 2 points). In this case, using Pythagoras's theorem is like reinventing the wheel.

    • 2 years ago
  17. erica.d Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i know that but what @across has done was not imagined by me ...by the way thanks

    • 2 years ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.