Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Dallasb22 Group Title

Find the area of the Trapezoid?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    • 2 years ago
    1 Attachment
  2. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    A=(_√_) divided by _

    • 2 years ago
  3. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @Hero help?

    • 2 years ago
  4. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @lgbasallote help?

    • 2 years ago
  5. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1348069206419:dw| do you know how to find x?

    • 2 years ago
  6. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ah i believe so.

    • 2 years ago
  7. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Actually i am brain frozen and cannot remember the formula. Can you tell me the formula please?

    • 2 years ago
  8. tyteen4a03 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The formula for tan x is opp/adj. The formula for finding the area of a trapezoid is ((upper length + lower length) * height)/2.

    • 2 years ago
  9. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Finding X in his above drawing would give me the height so i could than find the area.

    • 2 years ago
  10. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    But I do not remember how to find it. I have never used tan or sin before.

    • 2 years ago
  11. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1348069912936:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  12. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @tyteen4a03

    • 2 years ago
  13. tyteen4a03 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Were you taught trigonometry (sin, cos, tan) in your math lessons?

    • 2 years ago
  14. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I am only in Geometry, so not yet.

    • 2 years ago
  15. tyteen4a03 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    This question involves trigonometry... I will just give you a crash course. For the triangle |dw:1348070256213:dw| (do notice that these formulas only work on triangles with a right angle), we pick a angle that is not the right angle itself. This time, I pick <AC. (answers continued since I can't see what I just drew)

    • 2 years ago
  16. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ok

    • 2 years ago
  17. tyteen4a03 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    uh... I meant <C. Anyways, we usually represent angles with the symbol theta (\(\theta\)). Remember these properties: (all of these are lengths of the said line) sin \(\theta\) = opposite/hypotenuse (sine) cos \(\theta\) = adjacent/hypotenuse (cosine) tan \(\theta\) = opposite/adjacent (tangent) What is opposite and what is adjacent in here? Notice that the angle <C is opposite of the line AB, so that is the opposite line. The <C is adjacent (or in other terms "sticks") to the line BC, so that's the adjacent. Let's look back at the question bit @Igbasallote asked you to solve. Here, tan\(\theta\) = x/3 (opposite/adjacent). Multiply both sides by 3, and get 3 tan\(\theta\) = x. It also specified that the angle is 60 degrees. I'll give you the answer here: tan 60degrees = \(\sqrt{3}\). Now multiply the answer by 3, and the answer becomes \(3\sqrt{3}\). Congrats, you just learnt pieces your classmates might've never learned. However, I suggest telling your teacher that you haven't learned trigonometry yet so he/she will not give you these kind of questions.

    • 2 years ago
  18. tyteen4a03 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    (Just that if you're curious how I pulled tan 60degrees out of the air, 60 degrees is actually a special angle. You can find the values of trigonometry function on special angles here: http://www.mathwords.com/t/trig_values_of_special_angles.htm )

    • 2 years ago
  19. Dallasb22 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay i think i got it. Yes i know the triangle ratio 30-60-90

    • 2 years ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.