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moser90

  • 2 years ago

Use the center, vertices, and asymptotes to graph the hyperbola. (x - 1)2 - 9(y - 2)2 = 9

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  1. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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  2. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    I am totally stuck if someone can help me find the center I can figure out the rest

  3. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    is the center 0,0

  4. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/Alg/Hyperbolas.aspx is a good link to help you!

  5. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    I am just really confused because there is nothing on the bottom for a denominator

  6. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    I'm not sure myself, but it looks like it's (1,2) for the center.

  7. waleed_imtiaz
    • 2 years ago
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    First divide the whole equation by 9... (x - 1)^2/(9) - (y - 2)^2 =1 now U know a=3 and b=1 So focus is (+-c,o) because it is on x-axis..... Can u do now ?

  8. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    so the center is (1,3)

  9. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\frac{9}{1}=\frac{1}{\frac{1}{9}}=\frac{1}{(\frac{1}{3})^2}\]

  10. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    so this would make it the last picture right

  11. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    this one

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  12. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    If the center is (1,2) that is your only option!

  13. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    Did you check out the link? http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/Alg/Hyperbolas.aspx

  14. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    yes

  15. waleed_imtiaz
    • 2 years ago
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    centre would be (1,2) i think so

  16. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    Well that's two of us. I say it's a good bet.

  17. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    sometimes the pictures are just hard to go by

  18. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    but we know that it is not (0,0) or (-1,2) so the last one is the best

  19. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    When you look at formulas that have something like \[(x+h)\], you often want x to be modified only by addition or subtraction. If x is multiplied or divided by anything, get it out of the parenthesis! Anything multiplied or divided by \[(x+h)\]is then something that can really be expressed as just division if you want. By doing so, the equation you have will start to match up with the general formula for the shape of the curve.

  20. moser90
    • 2 years ago
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    thank you

  21. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    We are sure it is (1,2) when we compare it to the general formula. The position of the center of any shape can be found when you see how all x's and all y's are modified with addition or subtraction. This seems to "shift" graphs.

  22. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    You're welcome! :) Back to the "shifting", if you have y = (x), then y = (x+5) is looks to be shifted 5 up. Same with y = 9(x) seeming to shift 5 up when you look at y = 9(x+5).

  23. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    When you look at \[(x-h)^2\], \[(x-h)\]is how you are modifying x. You are finding the difference between them with subtraction. Then that difference is squared, so only the difference between them matters, not at all whether x>h or x<h.

  24. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    Lastly, for your future typed-up math discussions, it helps to express "to the power of 2" as "^2". It's a very common notation used on the internet.

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