anonymous
  • anonymous
Use the center, vertices, and asymptotes to graph the hyperbola. (x - 1)2 - 9(y - 2)2 = 9
Mathematics
chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am totally stuck if someone can help me find the center I can figure out the rest
anonymous
  • anonymous
is the center 0,0

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theEric
  • theEric
http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/Alg/Hyperbolas.aspx is a good link to help you!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am just really confused because there is nothing on the bottom for a denominator
theEric
  • theEric
I'm not sure myself, but it looks like it's (1,2) for the center.
waleed_imtiaz
  • waleed_imtiaz
First divide the whole equation by 9... (x - 1)^2/(9) - (y - 2)^2 =1 now U know a=3 and b=1 So focus is (+-c,o) because it is on x-axis..... Can u do now ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
so the center is (1,3)
theEric
  • theEric
\[\frac{9}{1}=\frac{1}{\frac{1}{9}}=\frac{1}{(\frac{1}{3})^2}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
so this would make it the last picture right
anonymous
  • anonymous
this one
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theEric
  • theEric
If the center is (1,2) that is your only option!
theEric
  • theEric
Did you check out the link? http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/Alg/Hyperbolas.aspx
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
waleed_imtiaz
  • waleed_imtiaz
centre would be (1,2) i think so
theEric
  • theEric
Well that's two of us. I say it's a good bet.
anonymous
  • anonymous
sometimes the pictures are just hard to go by
anonymous
  • anonymous
but we know that it is not (0,0) or (-1,2) so the last one is the best
theEric
  • theEric
When you look at formulas that have something like \[(x+h)\], you often want x to be modified only by addition or subtraction. If x is multiplied or divided by anything, get it out of the parenthesis! Anything multiplied or divided by \[(x+h)\]is then something that can really be expressed as just division if you want. By doing so, the equation you have will start to match up with the general formula for the shape of the curve.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thank you
theEric
  • theEric
We are sure it is (1,2) when we compare it to the general formula. The position of the center of any shape can be found when you see how all x's and all y's are modified with addition or subtraction. This seems to "shift" graphs.
theEric
  • theEric
You're welcome! :) Back to the "shifting", if you have y = (x), then y = (x+5) is looks to be shifted 5 up. Same with y = 9(x) seeming to shift 5 up when you look at y = 9(x+5).
theEric
  • theEric
When you look at \[(x-h)^2\], \[(x-h)\]is how you are modifying x. You are finding the difference between them with subtraction. Then that difference is squared, so only the difference between them matters, not at all whether x>h or x
theEric
  • theEric
Lastly, for your future typed-up math discussions, it helps to express "to the power of 2" as "^2". It's a very common notation used on the internet.

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