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eneidys Group Title

Scholasticism provides an example of which of the following? the blending of Norse and Christian culture the blending of Greek and Roman architectural styles the blending of Greek and Roman philosophies with Christian ideas the blending of Jewish and Christian ideas

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. Carl_Pham Group Title
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    Greek and Roman philosiphies with Christian dogma, really, although Christian ideas wil do. One of the more important Greco-Roman contributions was the philosophy of Plato, and his idea that every real thing we observe is a sort of "shadow" of some ideal version -- the so-called "Platonic ideal. So, for example, every real square does not have *exactly* equal sides, and perfect 90 degree angles, but it is a shadow or simulcrum of an ideal square, which does. Early Christians took this idea over to Christian dogma, viz., human love, charity, and justice are not ideal -- are flawed -- but they are shadows of an ideal Love, Charity and Justice which are out there somewhere -- in fact, in the person of God. To the early Christians, this idea of humans and their actions and feelings being shadows of an ideal perfectly encapsulated their idea of the relationship between humanity and God. He is the perfect, the ideal, towards which we struggle. The very fact that we can imagine an ideal is what "proves" the existence of the ideal -- of God. And so on. Scholasticism generally was the idea that much about the world could be deduced by starting with a very few self-evidently true axioms, and then deducing the rest, using principles of logic, consistency, and necessity. This was the way Euclid derived geometry and the properties of triangles, and this is the way medieval monks "derived" God's plan for the world. All very similar stuff. It was eventually overthrown in the 17th century by the principle of empiricism, which says that logic, no matter how apparently waterproof, is not to be given precedence over experimental results, and every logical deduction must be verified by experimental test.

    • 2 years ago
  2. eneidys Group Title
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    So whats the answer?

    • 2 years ago
  3. jazzy3342 Group Title
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    its B

    • 2 years ago
  4. alainal1 Group Title
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    B is incorrect. It may be irrelevant now, but anyone searching in the future should know.

    • one year ago
  5. Carl_Pham Group Title
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    Maybe next time try the third choice, which is what I suggested.

    • one year ago
  6. AdoomyG Group Title
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    Correct Answer is (C) or (the blending of Greek and Roman philosophies with Christian ideas)

    • 12 days ago
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