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moongazer

  • 2 years ago

What is the meaning of "or" , "and" in math?

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  1. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    and what do you call those?

  2. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    a or b (inclusive)\[a\vee b\] a and b \[a\wedge b\]

  3. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1348403720368:dw|

  4. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1348403767690:dw|

  5. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1348403820405:dw|

  6. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    what do you call those "and" "or"

  7. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    Conjunction \wedge \(\wedge\) Disjunction \vee \(\vee\)

  8. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    thanks, can you help in finding a domain of a function?

  9. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    Negation \neg \(\neg\) |dw:1348404218012:dw| \[\neg C\]

  10. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    what is your function?

  11. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1348405394804:dw|

  12. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    factorise the numerator and denominator

  13. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    btw, "or" is like the union of the set and "and" is like the intersection of a set. Is that correct?

  14. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1348405630353:dw|

  15. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    @UnkleRhaukus

  16. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    "or" is like union "and" is like intersection kinda but they are used for slightly different things, i think the logic symbols are used for points, where as the set symbols are used for sets of points

  17. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    what is the only number that dosent make sense in a denominator ? , what are two point values for x that would make your function undefined ?, exclude these from your domain

  18. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    {x|x>2 and x>3 and x>=5 and x>=4} is this correct?

  19. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    @UnkleRhaukus

  20. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    i get \[\{x|((x≠2)\wedge (x≠3))\}\]

  21. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    hmm im not right though

  22. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    The answer in my notebook says: dom K: {x|x<2 or 3<x<=4 or x>=5} I only copied that from my classmate because I was absent when my teacher discussed this. so I don't know how they got that

  23. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    there is a strange discontinuity where 4<x<5

  24. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    my notes also says that "use the number line to graph the values for which the function is defined.

  25. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    that is for finding the domain.

  26. moongazer
    • 2 years ago
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    @UnkleRhaukus

  27. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    well x is defined from -∞ to 2 , at 2 this is a discontinuity, the from 2 to 4 defined, then discontinuity from 4 to 5 then defined again from 5 to ∞

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