Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

ganeshie8

  • 3 years ago

is rotation possible for a person in space ?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. experimentX
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    similar question here http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/1372/is-rotational-motion-relative-to-space

  2. henpen
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm probably getting the wrong end of the stick, but I'd think not based on conservation of angular momentum.

  3. erica.d
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes rotation is possible in space for like infinite time, provided that , once that person should be rotated, he will keep rotating

  4. henpen
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That assumes that an independent 'rotator' is present, and I assume that ganeshie was asking about an independent self-rotator.

  5. erica.d
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that could be possible , for being a self rotator a person need to move himself using is inertia , i think he can rotate, provided that there should be platform over which he can have force of friction or something lol

  6. henpen
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    By the conservation of angular momentum, he could only spin some of himself clockwise by spinning an equal part anticlockwise.

  7. Mikael
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    \[\Huge\text{ A man is NOT a rigid body}\] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falling_cat_problem http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_righting_reflex

  8. Mikael
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    @ganeshie8

  9. experimentX
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    huh ... i thought this was absolute rotation problem? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absolute_rotation

  10. Mikael
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    http://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~phy189h1/Physics%20of%20Somersaults%20and%20Twists.pdf

  11. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thnks friends :) so its possible for a person to rotate himself. i dont understand the explanation in link completely... i feel i lack fundamentals. il get back after som more studying thank you :)

  12. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy