Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

cwrw238

  • 2 years ago

I'm helping my nephew with a function question and i'm stuck on one part - I should know this really. f(x) = x^2 - 19, domain = (-INF, 0) g(x) = 1 -(1/2) x, domain = (6, INF). Find range of f and g which i found to be (-19, INF) and (-INF, -2). Find fg - which I got to be (1 - (1/2)x)^2 - 19. Write down the domain and range of fg. - i'm a bit confused about this part.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I've done this stuff before but cant remember this bit.

  2. hsmt
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hi. i think i can help. consider the intersection of the two domains

  3. hsmt
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what is the intersection of the two domains?

  4. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    well they dont intersect - which makes me think that the domain is that of g (6, INF)

  5. hsmt
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the domain is the null set. and thus, it has not range either

  6. hsmt
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it has no* range either

  7. hsmt
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    does that make sense to you?

  8. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hmm - not sure to be honest - i'm not saying you're wrong - but i'll have to go back to the books thanx for your comments

  9. hsmt
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sure, the product, quotient and sums of two functions need to have intersecting domains

  10. hsmt
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    otherwise the function is not defined. I hope that helps. Take care.

  11. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ty

  12. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I've checked this out - because the domain of 'inner' function is (6.infinity) the composite function must have same domain - they intersect at that range of values hers a rough (lol) drawing

  13. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1348438040718:dw|

  14. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    Search OpenStudy
    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.