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hal_stirrup Group Title

In Infinite series the sum of infinite series is the (partial sum). Is that because its infinite and we can't sum up an infinite series ??

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    thanks of viewing.

    • 2 years ago
  2. estudier Group Title
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    Well, it's convenient for looking at convergence and limits, no?

    • 2 years ago
  3. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    yes. it is.

    • 2 years ago
  4. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    so what do you think of my question?.

    • 2 years ago
  5. estudier Group Title
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    Well, we can sum up the series (if the limit of partial sums exists)

    • 2 years ago
  6. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    we can? how do we know if the limit of partial sums exists?

    • 2 years ago
  7. estudier Group Title
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    Convergence

    • 2 years ago
  8. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    so your saying if a series Converges it partial sums exists

    • 2 years ago
  9. estudier Group Title
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    Well, if a series diverges, there wouldn't be any convergence, right?

    • 2 years ago
  10. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    yes

    • 2 years ago
  11. estudier Group Title
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    And you wouldn't be able to add it up however hard you tried

    • 2 years ago
  12. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    yes BUT because its a infinite series whether it converges or diverges we cant sum it all up?

    • 2 years ago
  13. estudier Group Title
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    That's what I'm saying, if it converges then you can (usually) add it up (analytically).

    • 2 years ago
  14. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    i see what your saying sure. i just don't see the idea of converges or diverges has anything to do with the fact that a series Converges and there for the partial sums exists

    • 2 years ago
  15. estudier Group Title
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    If the series converges then you can take a limit

    • 2 years ago
  16. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    All well and good that you are saying the facts. :) i really want to understand why we can take a limit when series converges and not diverges.

    • 2 years ago
  17. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    am sorry am being a pain.

    • 2 years ago
  18. estudier Group Title
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    the limit of a divergent series is infinite and some other limits might not exist (there are shades of convergence, absolute, conditional...)

    • 2 years ago
  19. estudier Group Title
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    You must have a way, analyytically, to approach a limit (even if you do not actually ever reach it)

    • 2 years ago
  20. estudier Group Title
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    I am assuming you have studied calculus, the limit concept there is similar.

    • 2 years ago
  21. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    i see . if we say that x-----> 2 x approaches 2 . what comment would you have?

    • 2 years ago
  22. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    i have studied CAL but in a very mechanical way!

    • 2 years ago
  23. estudier Group Title
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    You can say it and it implies that the limit is 2 but doesn't say anything about how you got that.

    • 2 years ago
  24. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    do we care how we get there . is that important for us?

    • 2 years ago
  25. estudier Group Title
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    How do we know that your limit is valid?

    • 2 years ago
  26. estudier Group Title
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    The limit of 1 + 1/2 +1/4 + 1/8 ......+1/2^n has a limit of 2 Do you believe me?

    • 2 years ago
  27. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    well you told me thats

    • 2 years ago
  28. estudier Group Title
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    Ok, it's not 2 it's 3

    • 2 years ago
  29. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    no its not !

    • 2 years ago
  30. estudier Group Title
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    Anyway, the point is that it converges and it is fairly easy to establish that 2 is an upper bound and with a little more work that the sum is actually 2

    • 2 years ago
  31. estudier Group Title
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    And now I am off to bed, I'm afraid.....

    • 2 years ago
  32. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    visually . |dw:1348445954284:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  33. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    thanks you Rock. :)

    • 2 years ago
  34. estudier Group Title
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    G'night:)

    • 2 years ago
  35. hal_stirrup Group Title
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    you too

    • 2 years ago
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