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Geometry_Hater

  • 3 years ago

Determine whether each equation defines y as a function of x. X = Y^2

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  1. qpHalcy0n
    • 3 years ago
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    In this case, no. You can rearrange it to be the case, but as given, "X is a function of y"

  2. Geometry_Hater
    • 3 years ago
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    Y= X ^2

  3. qpHalcy0n
    • 3 years ago
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    Well, no, that's not correct. But again, that's not what the question is actually asking.

  4. Geometry_Hater
    • 3 years ago
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    How exactly do you tell is Y is a function of x

  5. qpHalcy0n
    • 3 years ago
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    You don't need to do ANY of that.....

  6. qpHalcy0n
    • 3 years ago
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    Please look at the question.

  7. Geometry_Hater
    • 3 years ago
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    i would guess no because y isnt by itself..correct?

  8. qpHalcy0n
    • 3 years ago
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    It's not asking you to FIND y in terms of x, simply to say whether, as given, it is or not. In this case ...it is not. If "y" was "in terms of x" , y would be by itself y = something....

  9. liodeisel007
    • 3 years ago
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    my bad. I misunderstood

  10. qpHalcy0n
    • 3 years ago
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    ...and within that "something", there would be an "x" in there.

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