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Addisu

  • 3 years ago

How do you draw a velocity graph from an acceleration graph?

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  1. 4farhan4
    • 3 years ago
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    integrate the acceleration function to get the velocity function and then plot it

  2. stefo
    • 3 years ago
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    The answer is surely correct. Anyway, 4farhan4 probably refers to a graphical solution. As I depicted in the figure below, you can "estimate" the velocity function behaviour following these steps: 1. establish a base line (dotted line) as reference; 2. choose the time interval for your "graphical" integration; 3. first point of v is the distance of a curve and the base line; 4. the second point is the distance of v plus the distance of the previous point; 5. repeat the method of the previous step for the next points

  3. stefo
    • 3 years ago
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  4. gerryliyana
    • 3 years ago
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    using matlab

  5. rkrevolutionclass13
    • 3 years ago
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    first draw the co-ordinate axis x and y. now analyse three things and you will be able to draw velocity graph.. 1- see for very small time interval if acceleration is constant then at that interval velocity will increase but if acceleration is increasing then velocity will increase but more rapidly. 2-if acceleration is decreasing then also velocity will increase till it becomes zero but less rapidly. 3- if acceleration is zero then velocity will be constant. by analyzing these thing you can draw velocity graph..

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