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NotTim

  • 2 years ago

Simple practical application (no math): A child is standing on a slowly rotating ride in a park. the ride operator makes the statement that in Earth's frame of reference, the child remains at the same distance from the centre of the ride because there is no net force acting on him. Do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer.

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  1. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    MY ANSWER: Yes, I agree with this statement because the child maintains a constant radius throughout the ride. @ every point on the ride, there is the same gravitational force and centripetal force throughout

  2. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    I'm sorry but that is NOT a viable option.

  3. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    uhh

  4. YesterdayiSaidTomorow
    • 2 years ago
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    da fuk is Earth's frame of reference?

  5. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    txtbook.

  6. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    http://bit.ly/UAsCu4

  7. YesterdayiSaidTomorow
    • 2 years ago
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    post it on yahooanswers

  8. YesterdayiSaidTomorow
    • 2 years ago
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    this site sux

  9. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    lol like i trust yahoo answers.

  10. YesterdayiSaidTomorow
    • 2 years ago
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    hey mang, it's better than nothing

  11. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    NOThing

  12. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    I'm going to sleep. If anyone responds. I'll be back.

  13. eseidl
    • 2 years ago
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    I disagree. In the Earth's frame the child is moving in a circle. Since his velocity vector is constantly changing, his acceleration is NOT zero, thus there must be a net force acting on him.

  14. eseidl
    • 2 years ago
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    The net force acting on him is the centripetal force. It is the force that causes him to move in a circle. If there were no net force acting on him, he would continue to move in a straight line at content speed.

  15. eseidl
    • 2 years ago
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    constant*

  16. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    But relative to the earth's frame of reference?

  17. eseidl
    • 2 years ago
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    My answer is relative to the Earth's frame.

  18. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    so, really, the only reason why the child remains the same distance from the centre of the ride is because of the constant radiu, and not the force?

  19. eseidl
    • 2 years ago
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    Your answer states that you agree because there is the same net gravitational and centripetal force throughout the motion. It is true that the net forces are constant throughout the motion. The ride operator argues that there is NO net force on the kid. Obviously this is not correct, the kid isn't moving in a straight line at constant speed (Newton's first law).

  20. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    so, the correct answer is that although the child remains the same distance from the centre, their still is a net force acting upon him?

  21. eseidl
    • 2 years ago
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    the centripetal force is what keeps the kid at a constant distance from the center of the circle. If the centripetal force changed, the radius would change. In the extreme case, where the centripital force vanishes, the kid would fly off in straight line, away from the centre of the circle. |dw:1349029423494:dw|

  22. eseidl
    • 2 years ago
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    That's absolutely correct

  23. NotTim
    • 2 years ago
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    thx then

  24. eseidl
    • 2 years ago
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    Technically the centripetal force isn't constant. It has a constant magnitude, but the direction of the force is always changing (it is always pointing to the center of the circle as the kid moves around). The direction of the force is changing so it isn't a "constant" force.

  25. eseidl
    • 2 years ago
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    no problem. I hope this makes sense. Basically, the only time there is no NET force on an object is when the object moves in a straight line at constant speed. If either the speed or the direction of motion are not constant, there MUST be a NET force.

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