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clarkexo

  • 3 years ago

solve: a^2 · a^3 · a^-4

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  1. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    Nothing to solve... maybe they mean simplify? So when you multiply a variable with different exponents, what do you do the exponents... You add them right? For example: \[\large x^5\cdot x^6 = x^{5+6} = x^{11}\]

  2. clarkexo
    • 3 years ago
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    I cant see the example sorry, but would the answer be a^-1?

  3. clarkexo
    • 3 years ago
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    i mean a^1

  4. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    Yeah, but remember that \(a^1\) is just \(a\).

  5. Kashan
    • 3 years ago
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    yes this answer is right..

  6. Kashan
    • 3 years ago
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    (a^2+3) (a^-4) a^5 . a^-4 a^5-4 = a^1

  7. clarkexo
    • 3 years ago
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    ty

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