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MathSofiya

  • 2 years ago

@CliffSedge I have a table here that I don't quite understand x 0 1 2 3 4 5 P(x) 0.237 0.396 0.264 0.088 0.015 0.001 x= # of prisons out of 5 on parole who become repeat offenders. What is P(x)? and why does it add up to 1?

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  1. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    If they add up to 1, those could be probabilities or proportions.

  2. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    Criminal Justice: Parole USA Today reported that approximately 25% of all state prison inmates released on parole become repeat offenders while on parole. Suppose the parole board is examining five prisoners up for parole. Let x= number of prisoners out of five on parole who become repeat offenders. The methods of Section 5.2 can be used to compute the probability assignments for the x distribution.

  3. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    so x from 0 to 5 are not "the prisoners"

  4. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    I guess I don't understand what x is...sigh

  5. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    It is a little strangely worded, but it says that x is number out of 5, so x itself is a proportion.

  6. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    e.g. x=3 means 3 out of the 5 prisoners up for parole will be repeat offenders.

  7. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\frac05\] why is there are chance for repeat offense?

  8. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    probability I mean

  9. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    *shrug* that's just what they are measuring here.

  10. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    so when no one is on parole the probability or re-offending is 0.237? That's what they're trying to tell me?

  11. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    *of

  12. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    No, it's saying that for every 5 prisoners out on parole the probability that 0 of them will offend again is 0.237

  13. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    OOHHHHHH....LOL! That makes much more sense! haha

  14. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    5 are out on parole at all time I guess

  15. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    It's just an average 'per 5' basis. There could be 100 parolees, so x=3 means 60 out of 100.

  16. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    one last thing...

  17. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    the probability that 5/5 parolees will re-offend is very slim? highly unlikely?

  18. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    Yeah, 0.001 is pretty low, 1-in-1,000 chance, but if there are 5,000 parolees, then that's practically a sure thing.

  19. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    (Practically a sure thing to get 5 out of 5,000, not 5,000 out of 5,000 that is)

  20. MathSofiya
    • 2 years ago
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    Yep makes sense. Thank you once again!

  21. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    My pleasure.

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