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shivraj

  • 3 years ago

Given f(x)=x^2-1 and g(x)=x+1, find (fog)(x)?

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  1. sauravshakya
    • 3 years ago
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    (fog)(x) = f(g(x)) = f(x+1)

  2. sauravshakya
    • 3 years ago
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    @shivraj u got what I did??????

  3. shivraj
    • 3 years ago
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    no sir

  4. miteshchvm
    • 3 years ago
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    that means you need to put x= x + 1 in f(x)

  5. sauravshakya
    • 3 years ago
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    Yep: (fog)=f(g(x))

  6. sauravshakya
    • 3 years ago
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    Now, substitute there g(x)

  7. miteshchvm
    • 3 years ago
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    suppose f(1) = 0 f(x) = x^2 - 1 f[g(x)] = (x+1)^2 - 1

  8. shivraj
    • 3 years ago
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    ok

  9. miteshchvm
    • 3 years ago
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    you got it? @shivraj

  10. shivraj
    • 3 years ago
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    yep

  11. godfreysown
    • 3 years ago
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    if \[f(x)=x^2-1\ and \ g(x)=x+1, \\ \ then \ (fog)'(x)=\ (by \ product \ rule)\ u'v+u'v, \\where\ u=f(x); \ v=g(x) \\ \therefore\ (x^2-1)(1)+(2x)(x+1)=\\x^2-1+2x^2+2x=\\3x^2+2x-1=\\(3x-1)(x+1) \]

  12. shivraj
    • 3 years ago
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    thnks godfreysown

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