Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

MathSofiya

  • 3 years ago

More statistics. Binomial Probability \[P(r)=\frac{n!}{r!(n-r)!}p^rq^{n-r}=C_{n,r}p^rq^{n-r}\] The problem states 10% of adults deliberately do a one time fling (purchase clothing, wear 'em to an event, and return 'em). In a group of 7 adults what is the probability that anyone has done a one time fling? I figured that: n=7 r=0 I plugged those into the equation: \[P(0)=\frac{7!}{0!(7-0)!}p^0q^{7-0}=C_{7,0}p^0q^{7-0}\] What about p and q? The probability of success (p) is 0.1 (1% of people do one time flings)? and q would be 0.9? Would that be right?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @hartnn

  2. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @mathslover ?

  3. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    are u sure about n=7, r= 0 ?

  4. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    out of 7, any'one' has done a one.... so do u feel r should be 1 ?

  5. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the probability of success = probability of flinging = p = 10% = 0.1 \(\checkmark\) the probability of failure = probability of not flinging = q = 90% = 0.9 \(\checkmark\)

  6. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    just clear your confusion about, n and r

  7. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh sorry I was gone for while. Let's see here. Give me a second to read everything. Sorry :S

  8. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ok so about n and r. #number of trials How do I relate that to this problem? I guessed that n=7 because it looked nice, but I don't have a good explanation for why I picked it

  9. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I meant n=# of trials

  10. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    number of trials or events or no. of creatures/people on which experiment is performed = n =7 here, \(\checkmark\)

  11. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    r is the number of people 'chosen' here probability that anyONE has done fling implies, r=1 make sense? or more explanation?

  12. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so when we say r=0...

  13. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    almost never.....when we don't perform experiment.....maybe there are some special case for this

  14. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    make sure u understand why n=7, r=1 here

  15. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    When no one has done a fling wouldn't that be r=0?

  16. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    umm, yes i think so....(0.9)^7 seems right

  17. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a) No one has done a one-time fling? r=0 b) At least one person r=1 c.) No more than two people \[r \ge 2\] That's how I calculated it, whatcha think?

  18. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    b)P( atleast 1 person) =1-P (no one )

  19. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    no more = less r<=2

  20. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh yes. sorry.

  21. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    exactly 1---->r=1 atleast 1 = 1- none

  22. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    atmost 1 --> r<=1

  23. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    make sense ?

  24. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes, I think so.

  25. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Can I show you what I did for another problem. I think my thought process is right. Feel free to point out any errors.

  26. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    i will. yes show

  27. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Trevor is interested in purchasing the local hardware/sporting goods store in the small town of Dove Creek, Montana. After examining accounting records for the past several years, he found that the store has been grossing over $850 per day about 60% of the business days it is open. Estimate the probability that the store will gross over $850 (a) at least 3 out of 5 business days. (b) at least 6 out of 10 business days. (c) fewer than 5 out of 10 business days. p=.60 q=.40 a.) n=5 because "number of trials or events or no. of creatures/people on which experiment is performed " => In this case we have a total number of 5 days (events/trials) at least 3 out of 5 would mean: r>=3 To calculate this I would do P[r=3]+P[r=4]+P[r=5] b.) n=10 r>=6 To calculate.... P[r=6]+P[r=7]+P[r=8]+P[r=9]+P[r=10]

  28. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    and did u get correct answer for the problem posted ? n=7,r=1,p=0.1,q=0.9

  29. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and for (c) n=10 r<5

  30. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    all n, r selections \(\huge \checkmark\)

  31. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yaaay!!!!! For the first problem I got a.) 0.478 b.) 0.522 c.) 0.974

  32. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    sorry, i didn't do calculation part, i thought u had answers to verify, method is correct

  33. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I did have the answers =)

  34. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Thank you once again my friend!

  35. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    so did they match? welcome ^_^

  36. MathSofiya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes sir!

  37. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    ok :)

  38. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy