anonymous
  • anonymous
I got this question in my exam but could not answer it.its not even at google.. Q- What are the limitations of zeroth law of thermodynamics?
Engineering
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get this expert

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this
and thousands of other questions

anonymous
  • anonymous
Let's see.... The zeroth law just basically defines temperature. It saws that if bodies A and B are in thermal equilibrium (they have the same temperature), and B is in thermal equilibrium with C, then A is in thermal equilibrium with C, too. I would argue that there are no limitations for this reason: The zeroth law was sort of an after thought. Scientists had been studying heat and thermal energy for years and then realized it would be beneficial to to be able to define a way to quantify thermal energy. I believe it was first stated after the first and second laws were proven. In application, the law says that if we measure the temperature of two bodies and they have the same temperature, they are in thermal equilibrium. It also allows us to measure temperature because it proves that if we place a thermometer in a hot bath of water, for example, the thermometer will reach equilibrium with the water. This is indicated when the thermometer stops changing temperature. I'll look into this more and see if I can uncover anything.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Please see to it..It would be very helpful..:)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Perhaps your professor meant to say "limitations of the first law?" There are definitely a few. The second law does not have any except that it is very statistical.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
i dont think he meant this..i confirmed it..:)
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay i got the answer. Perhaps, there is an innate assumption that systems to an equilibrium state spontaneously is the limitation. but physically no system reaches equilibrium spontaneously hence we can say that there is no limitation of zeroth law..:)

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.