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a Ferris wheel that rotates five times each minute. It carries each car around a circle of diameter 18.0 m. What force (magnitude and direction) does the seat exert on a 53.0-kg child when the rider is halfway between top and bottom?

Mathematics
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This question would be more suited in physics section.
yeah but they hardly ever have physics people on here
Haha

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Other answers:

|dw:1349189537433:dw|
yes he can be anywhere it doesn't matter..
it says in the question 5 times each minute
i dont know where to start on this one
"..when the rider is halfway between top and bottom?" |dw:1349189927715:dw|
ok
The resultant is the vector sum of the child's weight (up) and the centripetal force (towards center)
ok
and thats for start
Can you convert that 5rpm into a linear speed, or at least an angular velocity in radians per second?
5/60?
nope
That will give you revolutions per second, but you need to convert revolutions to something useful like radians or meters.
can you do it?
Yes, it's a pretty easy operation, but I think you'll get more satisfaction if you try it yourself.
I already did try, i couldn't do it
Would it be 90m/s
no idea?
May be the answer would be, 5300N clockwise
Try posting this in the physics section. Surely you would get an answer.
how did you get that
A mistake it would be 530N Well, the weight of the child is 53 kg gravitational acceleration appro. 10m/s2 then force= mass * acceleration = 53kg* 10m/s2 = 530kg/s2 = 530N
i think thats wrong
5rpm means 5 times 2π radians per minute. Divide by 60 to get radians/second. Multiply that by the radius of 9m to get linear speed. centripetal acceleration (just like in the last problem you did) is v^2/r.
i need to get going in about 10 minutes can you show me the steps and what the answer is so i can have a better understanding @CliffSedge
i got 4.71 after i multiplied it by 9
Ok, that will be your linear speed. Square that and divide by the radius to get centripetal acceleration. Mass times acceleration will give you force. Use mg to find the weight force. The resultant is the vector sum of those two forces. If you don't know how to find resultant vectors, then please go back to your book and study.
so 388.76? is this correct, i only have 1 attempt left?
?
You need magnitude and direction. What is the direction of the force vector?
How did you get 388.76? What are the units of that number?
Did you get 2.467 m/s^2 for the centripetal acceleration?

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