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ilikephysics2

a Ferris wheel that rotates five times each minute. It carries each car around a circle of diameter 18.0 m. What force (magnitude and direction) does the seat exert on a 53.0-kg child when the rider is halfway between top and bottom?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. Miyuru
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    This question would be more suited in physics section.

    • one year ago
  2. ilikephysics2
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    yeah but they hardly ever have physics people on here

    • one year ago
  3. theredhead1617
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    Haha

    • one year ago
  4. Miyuru
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    |dw:1349189537433:dw|

    • one year ago
  5. ilikephysics2
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    yes he can be anywhere it doesn't matter..

    • one year ago
  6. ilikephysics2
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    it says in the question 5 times each minute

    • one year ago
  7. ilikephysics2
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    i dont know where to start on this one

    • one year ago
  8. CliffSedge
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    "..when the rider is halfway between top and bottom?" |dw:1349189927715:dw|

    • one year ago
  9. ilikephysics2
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    ok

    • one year ago
  10. CliffSedge
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    The resultant is the vector sum of the child's weight (up) and the centripetal force (towards center)

    • one year ago
  11. ilikephysics2
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    ok

    • one year ago
  12. ilikephysics2
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    and thats for start

    • one year ago
  13. CliffSedge
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    Can you convert that 5rpm into a linear speed, or at least an angular velocity in radians per second?

    • one year ago
  14. ilikephysics2
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    5/60?

    • one year ago
  15. Miyuru
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    nope

    • one year ago
  16. CliffSedge
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    That will give you revolutions per second, but you need to convert revolutions to something useful like radians or meters.

    • one year ago
  17. ilikephysics2
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    can you do it?

    • one year ago
  18. CliffSedge
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    Yes, it's a pretty easy operation, but I think you'll get more satisfaction if you try it yourself.

    • one year ago
  19. ilikephysics2
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    I already did try, i couldn't do it

    • one year ago
  20. Miyuru
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    Would it be 90m/s

    • one year ago
  21. ilikephysics2
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    no idea?

    • one year ago
  22. Miyuru
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    May be the answer would be, 5300N clockwise

    • one year ago
  23. Miyuru
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    Try posting this in the physics section. Surely you would get an answer.

    • one year ago
  24. ilikephysics2
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    how did you get that

    • one year ago
  25. Miyuru
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    A mistake it would be 530N Well, the weight of the child is 53 kg gravitational acceleration appro. 10m/s2 then force= mass * acceleration = 53kg* 10m/s2 = 530kg/s2 = 530N

    • one year ago
  26. ilikephysics2
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    i think thats wrong

    • one year ago
  27. CliffSedge
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    5rpm means 5 times 2π radians per minute. Divide by 60 to get radians/second. Multiply that by the radius of 9m to get linear speed. centripetal acceleration (just like in the last problem you did) is v^2/r.

    • one year ago
  28. ilikephysics2
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    i need to get going in about 10 minutes can you show me the steps and what the answer is so i can have a better understanding @CliffSedge

    • one year ago
  29. ilikephysics2
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    i got 4.71 after i multiplied it by 9

    • one year ago
  30. CliffSedge
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    Ok, that will be your linear speed. Square that and divide by the radius to get centripetal acceleration. Mass times acceleration will give you force. Use mg to find the weight force. The resultant is the vector sum of those two forces. If you don't know how to find resultant vectors, then please go back to your book and study.

    • one year ago
  31. ilikephysics2
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    so 388.76? is this correct, i only have 1 attempt left?

    • one year ago
  32. ilikephysics2
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    ?

    • one year ago
  33. CliffSedge
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    You need magnitude and direction. What is the direction of the force vector?

    • one year ago
  34. CliffSedge
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    How did you get 388.76? What are the units of that number?

    • one year ago
  35. CliffSedge
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    Did you get 2.467 m/s^2 for the centripetal acceleration?

    • one year ago
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