anonymous
  • anonymous
Two squares are inscribed in a semicircle, as shown. The area of the smaller square is 16. What is the area of the larger square?
Mathematics
chestercat
  • chestercat
See more answers at brainly.com
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get this expert

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this
and thousands of other questions

anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1349246075538:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
wow, that's not too easy, is it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
not enough info
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1349246702016:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
that geometry could give you a radius of the larger square, if you knew anything at all about the dimensions or area
anonymous
  • anonymous
sorry, not "radius of square" (it's late) diagonal of square = radius of circle
hartnn
  • hartnn
|dw:1349246849703:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
I stand ready to be wow'd... please continue...
hartnn
  • hartnn
i mean thats the info needed to be given, then u can find the area
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok, I'm with you on that...
anonymous
  • anonymous
I thought you were about to pull some geometry magic...
anonymous
  • anonymous
expectations run high, ya know...
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1349248195417:dw| i hope the following figure solves it , let y be the length of side of big square, then \[ r=\sqrt{y^2+(y^2/4)}\] and also from the other traingle \[r=\sqrt { 16+(4+y/2)^2 }\] equate both the equations and solve for y ,and ares of bigger square is y^2
anonymous
  • anonymous
@rafeds08 solve the above equations to get the answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
I haven't solved, but that appears logical... well done :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks @JakeV8 , i haven't solved it either but i think solving these equations will give the answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
I agree... good eye to see another way to define "r". Nitpick... looks like you drew a right angle symbol on the inside of the larger triangle with sides r, y, and y/2, situated along the other radius line drawn toward the smaller circle. This appears misplaced, or the symbol is something else, or I don't get it (option c is always a good guess)... Can you explain?
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1349249269180:dw| which symbol can u point it out....
anonymous
  • anonymous
@JakeV8 i just used the orignal diagram, but icant seem to find the symbol u r talking abt, to me it clearly looks that both the triangles are right angled.
anonymous
  • anonymous
never mind :) I just realized it's the label "r" on the second radius... my oops!
anonymous
  • anonymous
@rafeds08 did u get the answer on solving the above equations
anonymous
  • anonymous
they told me its 64
anonymous
  • anonymous
thus radius of big circle is 8

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.