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TomLikesPhysics Group Title

I can only find derivative for x>0 , but I don't know why (according to wolfram).

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. TomLikesPhysics Group Title
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    mom I need to attach the equations

    • 2 years ago
  2. TomLikesPhysics Group Title
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    • 2 years ago
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  3. TomLikesPhysics Group Title
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    My f`is apparently only true for x>0 and I have no clue where I make that assumption in my differentiation.

    • 2 years ago
  4. Zekarias Group Title
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    Your f' is defined only for |R\{-6^{0.5), 6^(0.5)}, actually

    • 2 years ago
  5. TuringTest Group Title
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    how do you figure @Zekarias

    • 2 years ago
  6. TuringTest Group Title
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    f' is not defined at +/-6^(0.5), but it is for all other points as far as I see

    • 2 years ago
  7. TuringTest Group Title
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    I do see one problem which is that for -6^(0.5)<|x|0 the slope should be negative, but the derivative is positive

    • 2 years ago
  8. TuringTest Group Title
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    -6^(0.5)<|x|<0 I meant

    • 2 years ago
  9. TuringTest Group Title
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    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=plot%20y%3D(x%5E2-6)%5E(2%2F3)&t=crmtb01 you can see the slope is negative for -6^(1/2)<x<0, but the derivative would be positive as you have it

    • 2 years ago
  10. TomLikesPhysics Group Title
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    ok, so how should I take the derivative then? Without rewriting it and using the chainrule over and over?

    • 2 years ago
  11. TuringTest Group Title
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    that I'm not so sure about. I'm thinking on it.

    • 2 years ago
  12. TuringTest Group Title
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    @amistre64 any ideas here?

    • 2 years ago
  13. amistre64 Group Title
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    the derivative on the attachment looks fine; im not sure what the question is tho

    • 2 years ago
  14. TuringTest Group Title
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    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=derivative+of+y%3D%28x%5E2-6%29%5E%282%2F3%29 true I don't see wolf giving the condition that x>0

    • 2 years ago
  15. TuringTest Group Title
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    but what about the point I brought up? f' for -6^(1/2)<x<0 should be negative, but it's positive

    • 2 years ago
  16. amistre64 Group Title
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    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=derivative+cbrt%28%28x%5E2-6%29%5E2%29 i think this has more intricate workings than we think

    • 2 years ago
  17. amistre64 Group Title
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    \[u=(x^2-6)^2~:~u'=4x(x^2-6)\] \[D[u^{1/3}]=\frac{u^{-1/3}}{3}u'\] \[D[u^{1/3}]=\frac{4x(x^2-6)}{3((x^2-6)^2)^{1/3}}\]

    • 2 years ago
  18. amistre64 Group Title
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    at -1\[\frac{-*-}{+}=+\]

    • 2 years ago
  19. TuringTest Group Title
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    but that should not be if you look at the graph http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=plot%20y%3D(x%5E2-6)%5E(2%2F3)&t=crmtb01 should be f'<0 at x=-1

    • 2 years ago
  20. amistre64 Group Title
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    notice that the function\[\sqrt[3]{((x^2-6)^2)}\ne \left(\sqrt[3]{(x^2-6)}\right)^2\]at all points http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=%28%28x%5E2-6%29%5E2%29%5E%281%2F3%29+-+%28%28x%5E2-6%29%5E%281%2F3%29%29%5E2

    • 2 years ago
  21. amistre64 Group Title
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    the subtlties are in how we are not using the "correct" use of a derivative

    • 2 years ago
  22. amistre64 Group Title
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    the way we are used to working with exponents seems to be a misuse of notation and doesnt express the full nature of the problem http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=y%3D%28%28x%5E2-6%29%5E2%29%5E%281%2F3%29%2C+y%3D+%28%28x%5E2-6%29%5E%281%2F3%29%29%5E2

    • 2 years ago
  23. TomLikesPhysics Group Title
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    So I should not rewrite the equation and just use the chainrule multiple times then to end up with the same answer as wolfram does?

    • 2 years ago
  24. amistre64 Group Title
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    correct, I would simplify it by making a substitution; then replacing those values in the end

    • 2 years ago
  25. TomLikesPhysics Group Title
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    k, thx. I will try that now.

    • 2 years ago
  26. TomLikesPhysics Group Title
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    Damn. That went well and it was pretty quick and easy too. So the first attempt did not work because I messed the exponents up?

    • 2 years ago
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