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Claire4christ

  • 3 years ago

The standard baseball measures 2 11/16" in diameter. What is its volume (to the nearest hundredth)? _____cu. in.

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  1. Claire4christ
    • 3 years ago
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    @JakeV8

  2. JakeV8
    • 3 years ago
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    what's the volume equation for a sphere?

  3. Claire4christ
    • 3 years ago
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    4/3pir^3

  4. JakeV8
    • 3 years ago
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    that's better :) So find the radius...

  5. Claire4christ
    • 3 years ago
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    we gonna divide

  6. Claire4christ
    • 3 years ago
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    2 11/16

  7. JakeV8
    • 3 years ago
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    that's the diameter, so you need to divide 2 11/16 in half to get the radius.. .careful with the fractions :)

  8. Claire4christ
    • 3 years ago
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    0.6875=11/16

  9. Claire4christ
    • 3 years ago
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    43

  10. JakeV8
    • 3 years ago
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    diameter = 2 11/16 = 2.6875 radius = diameter / 2 = 1.34375 Volume = (4/3) pi (radius^3) = (4/3) pi (1.34375^3) = (4/3) pi (2.4264) = 5.8416 pi = 18.3519 =18.35 cm^3 <<-- rounded to nearest hundredths That's what I got... not sure where you got 43? But I could have made an error... might want to check it.

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