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Ice_Wolf

  • 3 years ago

I Need Help With This Problem!?!?!

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  1. Ice_Wolf
    • 3 years ago
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  2. TheWriter
    • 3 years ago
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    I don't remember how to do that. Sorry.

  3. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    \(a^0=1\) might help

  4. TheWriter
    • 3 years ago
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    Nope, still don't remember how.

  5. Ice_Wolf
    • 3 years ago
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    It's Ok. Thanks Anyways.

  6. futrchamp
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay. a^1 is a, by definition. a^0 is 1 (this can be seen by using the laws of dividing exponents, since any number divided by itself is 1) a^-n is 1/a^n (This is because raising one power is multiplying a by itself, but subtracting 1 from the exponent of a^0 is 1/a, and so on) 1/a^-n is a^n, by the same logic.

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