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dddan

  • 3 years ago

in the reaction of Si+2Cl yields SiCl4 in this reaction 0.507 mole of SiCl4 is produced how many moles of molecular chlorine were used in the reaction? please explain.

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  1. Ahaanomegas
    • 3 years ago
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    \[ \text{Si} + 2\text{Cl} \rightarrow \text{SiCl}_4 \]Is this equation balanced? No! Why? Because the problem, as posted, is incorrect. Chlorine gas must be diatomic: Cl_2. After doing that, the equation is balanced. From here, use the coefficient ratios for mole ratios and it should be easy. Note, from the balanced equation, 2 moles of chlorine are required to form 1 mole of SiCl_4. If you still need help, let me know. I'll complete the solution for you. :D

  2. dddan
    • 3 years ago
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    thanks, can you show me?

  3. Ahaanomegas
    • 3 years ago
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    Sure. Do you see how 1 mole of SiCl_4 is formed from 2 moles of chlorine gas? Once you see that, you just do .507*2. :)

  4. dddan
    • 3 years ago
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    yup got it. thank you!

  5. Ahaanomegas
    • 3 years ago
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    No problem! :D

  6. dddan
    • 3 years ago
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    how do you balance out \[O _{2}+NO \rightarrow 0_{2}+NO _{2}\]

  7. Ahaanomegas
    • 3 years ago
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    You cannot. The O_2s cancel out and NO -> NO_2 is nonsense. Did you mean something else?

  8. dddan
    • 3 years ago
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    yea it O(3)+NO yields O(2)+NO(2)

  9. Ahaanomegas
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh. \[ O_3 + NO \rightarrow O_2 + NO_2 \]Yep, the 3 is hard to read as a subscript. There are 3 Os on the LHS and 4 Os on the RHS. Try balancing the Os. Put a 2 on the O3 and 3 on the O2. You get: \[ 2O_3 + NO \rightarrow 3O_2 + NO_2 \]Now, there are 7 Os on the LHS and 8 Os on the RHS. Notice, here, that you can keep trying what you want but keeping the Ns balanced means keeping the Os imbalanced. The equation cannot be balanced. See here: http://www.gregthatcher.com/Chemistry/BalanceChemicalEquations.aspx

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