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chicagochica5

  • 3 years ago

Is the difference of two polynomials always a polynomial? Explain.

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  1. gjhfdfg
    • 3 years ago
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    Not always,

  2. Decart
    • 3 years ago
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    no a term could cancel out

  3. helder_edwin
    • 3 years ago
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    yes it is.

  4. Decart
    • 3 years ago
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    the differance is subtraction like 3x-6 - 4x+6

  5. Decart
    • 3 years ago
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    poly means more than one otherwise it is a monomial

  6. Decart
    • 3 years ago
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    what do you think @helder_edwin

  7. helder_edwin
    • 3 years ago
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    yes. but monomials are only a particular case of polynomials.

  8. chicagochica5
    • 3 years ago
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    so what would the answer be

  9. helder_edwin
    • 3 years ago
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    if q(x) is polynomial, is -q(x) still a polynomial?

  10. Decart
    • 3 years ago
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    A polynomial in one variable (i.e., a univariate polynomial) with constant coefficients is given by (1) The individual summands with the coefficients (usually) included are called monomials

  11. Decart
    • 3 years ago
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    so yes it still is a polynomial you are correct @helder_edwin

  12. chicagochica5
    • 3 years ago
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    yes its still a polynomial because....

  13. chicagochica5
    • 3 years ago
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    @UnkleRhaukus can you help please?

  14. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    A polynomial is a number or algebraic expression with no variables having fractional or negative exponents.

  15. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    So 5 - 2 = 3 is a difference of two polynomials yielding another polynomial. There shouldn't be any way to subtract polynomials and get something that is not a polynomial.

  16. chicagochica5
    • 3 years ago
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    @CliffSedge so for the answer i write, Yes the difference of two polynomials are always polynomials. Because why

  17. chicagochica5
    • 3 years ago
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    @hartnn can you help please

  18. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    the difference of two polynomials are always polynomials. Because there is no way to subtract polynomials and get something that is not a polynomial.

  19. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    In more detail: Since the only way for a polynomial to become not a polynomial is if you took a root of a variable or divided by a variable, and that won't happen if all you're doing is subtracting.

  20. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    even \(f(x)=0\) is a polynomial

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