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find the slope of the line tangent to the following curve where x = 1...

Mathematics
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\[y = \sin[x - \tan (\frac{ \Pi }{ 4 }x^{66})] + x ^{\frac{ 1 }{ 1 + 66\Pi }}\]
if you cant see the exponent part at the end, its: \[\frac{ 1 }{ 1+66\Pi }\]
answer is -99Pi

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Other answers:

im currently at this step: \[\frac{ -66\Pi }{ 4} + \frac{ 1 }{ 1 + 66\Pi }\]
Oh goodness.. this one again iop? XD
heh
Hmm
What is that symbol? Is that suppose to be pi?
yes
Why don't u use lowercase? D: that's so confusing..
i was wondering if that was confusing people
i guess so
Hmm you sure the step you got to is correct so far? :O
i got this for y prime: \[y' = \cos[x - \tan(\frac{ \pi }{ 4 }x^{66})](1 - \sec^2(\frac{ \pi }{ 4 }x^{66}))(\frac{ 66\pi }{ 4 }x^{65}) + \frac{ 1 }{ 1+66\pi }x^\frac{ 1 }{ 1+66\pi }-1\]
So what i tried to do is... After you get a common denominator and all that jazz.. you have something that looks like a polynomial in the numerator. And I'm not seeing it factor nicely :( at least not in any way that will cancel with the denominator. Hmmm
plugged 1 in.. \[y'(1) = 1(-1)(\frac{ 66\pi }{ 4 })(\frac{ 1 }{ 1+ 66\pi })\]
lol
the factoring is the confusing part... how am i supposed to get it to -99pi
unless the steps i did to get it to that point were incorrect...i dont think so
|dw:1349581968847:dw| Hmm yah your steps look good so far :o
yep
Oh that last term should be addition.. my bad. The way that you have it originally wrote out.
yea
|dw:1349582282567:dw| Hmmmm...
yes! i did that, now im stuck..
some kind of factorization trick in there, perhaps?
Mmmm I don't see one :\ Must be something else going on there. Blah I give up! XD
thanks anyway
What the **** kind of teacher give you question like that?!? Or did you make up this question on your own?
online homework haha
|dw:1349583464134:dw|
the 4's cancel out..but then what? lol
i guess the neg sign could be the neg sign in the answer: -99pi
What we currently have = -51.83147906... -99pi = -311.0176727 Hmmm something isn't right, that doesn't equal -99pi
yes that too
i guess i could submit this answer wrong and get a similar question with different values
or that could make things worse
According to WolframAlpha, the answer is -102.68 or \[1-33 \pi+\frac{1}{1+66 \pi}\] http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=derivative+of++sin%28x+-+tan%28pi+%2F+4+x%5E66%29%29+%2B+x%5E%28%281%29%2F%281%2B66+pi%29%29+when+x+%3D+1

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