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PedroSoccer

  • 2 years ago

What type of quadratic equation is represented in the graph below? Not enough information Non-factorable Trinomial Perfect Square Trinomial Difference of Two Squares http://learn.flvs.net/webdav/assessment_images/educator_algebra1_v10/09_02_08.jpg

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  1. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    The graph is in the link. Please help? Thanks! :)

  2. Barcasucks123
    • 2 years ago
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    no

  3. ipm1988
    • 2 years ago
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    cannot see the graph

  4. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    That was not necessary @Barcasucks123.

  5. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    @ipm1988 I'll work on it :)

  6. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    hmm. I'm not sure why it wouldn't show up... :$

  7. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    @ipm1988 does it still not show up?

  8. ipm1988
    • 2 years ago
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    nope just use print screen and post a picture

  9. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    hmm my computer won't let me. I used control + p and everything

  10. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    If I click on the link, it shows up for me. maybe my computer is having problems or something. Thanks though! :)

  11. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    Can you try copying the link and opening it in a new tab though? Just to try?

  12. AccessDenied
    • 2 years ago
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    The issue is probably that we don't have accounts / are not logged into a system there like you are. :P "The system is unable to access the cookie that was assigned to your computer upon login. The most likely cause of this problem is an improper access to the course via a bookmark, browser window that was left open, or an improper exit from the system.

  13. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    Oh, that might be it. Thanks! :)

  14. AccessDenied
    • 2 years ago
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    If possible, you could try drawing what the graph looks like here, including any details like intercepts. :)

  15. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    Okay, I'll give it a shot :)

  16. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1349652754929:dw|

  17. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    Does that give enough info?

  18. AccessDenied
    • 2 years ago
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    Hmm... so those intercepts are (-2, 0), (2, 0), and (0, -4)?

  19. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes :)

  20. AccessDenied
    • 2 years ago
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    Well, with the x-intercepts / our zeros of the graph, we can tell that x = 2 and x = -2 are solutions. That means in terms of a quadratic equation, we have k(x - a)(x - b) = 0: with 'a =2' and 'b = -2' (The extra k is because we could have an extra constant multiplied on there). y = k(x - 2)(x + 2) = 0 y = k(x^2 - 4) Then for the extra 'k', we just have to use (0, -4): -4 = k(0^2 - 4) -4 = k(-4) 1 = k So, plug that in, we simply get: y = x^2 - 4 Looks a lot like a difference of two squares, right? :)

  21. PedroSoccer
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes! Thanks so much! :)

  22. AccessDenied
    • 2 years ago
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    You're welcome!

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