Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

shujaatali

if we integrat a constan then we get ans x why???

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

  • This Question is Open
  1. Silent_Sorrow
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    A constant is simply a variable (with a non-zero coefficient) raised to the power of zero, so when you integrate say, 2 (which is the same as 2x^0) you'll get (2x^1)/1 Also when you differentiate a linear equation you get a constant (y=2x, dy/dx=2) which is just the reverse process of integration.

    • one year ago
  2. pasta
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Adding on SIlent-Sorrow's answer.if x is the problem the you can use another letter like c .ie int-{1}dc.then u will still get c.

    • one year ago
  3. jamescarie
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Integration is simply a Summation over sum range. when u add sum constant in give range that will varry acording to range of integration.so it is variable,we can assume it as x.

    • one year ago
  4. adi171
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    see actually u look to this question as this...... as integration is caleed as reverse process of of differentiation or simply the inverse function.... so when we find the derivative of a function x....we get 1........so what happens when we integrate 1.....???? js go the reverse process... i.e. 1=x(integration)

    • one year ago
  5. Jow
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    First of all, when doing integrals, it's alway good to do th ereverse process: the derivatives. Imagine the following integral: \[\int\limits_{}^{}Cdx \rightarrow X\] Now let's derive the function f(x) = x |dw:1350329860251:dw| This is why. For definite integrals, you just take the difference between the upper and the lower limit, as follows: \[\int\limits_{5}^{7}Cdx \rightarrow X\] Now evaluate this integral between 7 and 5: 7 - 5 = 2. That's it.

    • one year ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.