Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

calculushelp01

  • 3 years ago

derivative of sqrt x + (1/4) sin (2x)^2

  • This Question is Closed
  1. kelly226
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    If the square is meant for the sin... y = sqrt x + (1/4)[sin 2x]^2 y' = (1/2)(1 / sqrt x) + (1/4)(2)(sin 2x)(cos 2x)(2) = (1 / 2 sqrt x) + (sin 2x)(cos 2x)

  2. kelly226
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    If the square is only on the 2x... y = sqrt x + (1/4)sin (2x)^2 = sqrt x + (1/4) sin (4x^2) y' = (1/2)(1 / sqrt x) + (1/4)[cos (4x^2)](4*2x) = (1 / 2 sqrt x) + (2x)cos (4x^2)

  3. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hint : derivative of sqrt(f(x)) = 1/(f'(x)*sqrt(f(x)) and derivative of sin(g(x))=g'(x)*cos(g(x))

  4. calculushelp01
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    could you step by step for the solution (the square is only on the 2x)

  5. kelly226
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    If the square is only on the 2x... y = sqrt x + (1/4)sin (2x)^2 = sqrt x + (1/4) sin (4x^2) y' = (1/2)(1 / sqrt x) + (1/4)[cos (4x^2)](4*2x) = (1 / 2 sqrt x) + (2x)cos (4x^2)

  6. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @kelly226 is right

  7. calculushelp01
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    is the the (2x)^2 becoming (2x^2) product rule?

  8. kelly226
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i dont think so...

  9. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    its use chain rule... derivative of (2x)^2 is 2(2x)*2

  10. calculushelp01
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wouldnt the derivative of (2x)^2 be 4x then according to chain rule= 2(2x)^2-1 (2)

  11. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2(2x)*2=8x not 4x

  12. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but, if we look the first question there is a coefficien of sin (2x)^2 (is 1/4), so multiply it by derivative of sin (2x)^2

  13. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    therefore, 1/4*2(2x)*2*cos(2x)^2 = 2xcos(2x)^2

  14. calculushelp01
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I understand the 2xcos part of the solution. But I dont understand why the original (2x)^2 remains

  15. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    because derivative of sin(f(x) is f'(x)*cos(f(x))

  16. calculushelp01
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh okay thank you very much

  17. RadEn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wellcome :)

  18. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy