Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

richyw

charged particles each of magnitude \(2.00 \mu C\) are located on the x axis, one is at x=1.00m, the other is at x=-1.00m. Determine the electric potential on the y axis at y=0.500m.

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. richyw
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I don't understand why this is zero. why is it zero?

    • one year ago
  2. JamesWolf
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1349753624257:dw| Im not sure either. I would expect it to be zero if this were the case|dw:1349753700882:dw| hope you find out

    • one year ago
  3. richyw
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm pretty sure it's not zero and my book has the wrong answer. All I did was say \[V=\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}\sum^i_{i=1}\frac{q_i}{r_i}\]\[V=\frac{2q_1}{4\pi\epsilon_0r_1}\]Since \(r_1=r_2\) and \(q_1=q_2\) Is this correct?

    • one year ago
  4. TuringTest
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    |dw:1349763953576:dw|horizontal components cancel leaving vertical\[\vec E=\frac{2q}{4\pi\epsilon_0r^2}\sin\theta\hat j=\frac{2qy}{4\pi\epsilon_0r^3}\hat j\]bringing a point charge along y from +infty\[V=\int_{\infty}^{1/2}Edy=\frac q{2\pi\epsilon_0}\int_\infty^{1/2}\frac y{(1+y^2)^{3/2}}dy\]\[=\frac q{2\pi\epsilon_0\sqrt{1+\frac14}}=\frac {q_0}{\pi\epsilon\sqrt5}\]a nice answer, but not zero I agree your book is wrong

    • one year ago
  5. TuringTest
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    slight typo\[=\frac q{2\pi\epsilon_0\sqrt{1+\frac14}}=\frac q{\pi\epsilon_0\sqrt5}\]

    • one year ago
  6. Algebraic!
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @turingtest That's the right answer. You don't need to go through all that however, it's simply 2kq/r where r= sqrt(5/4)

    • one year ago
  7. TuringTest
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    lol I know, I just wanted to be rigorous. I always feel better about disagreeing with the book when I can prove something from scratch.

    • one year ago
  8. richyw
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thanks, you think paying $250 for a textbook and two solution manuals they could put some effort into explaining solutions (or at least give correct answers!) haha.

    • one year ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.