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rvgupta

  • 2 years ago

Does our universe have an edge? if yes. Explain

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  1. thivitaa
    • 2 years ago
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    i dont think our universe really have an edge...

  2. harsh314
    • 2 years ago
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    if we look on it practically as we know the universe is expanding and the edge of the universe depends on that expansion we can say that the edge of the universe is continuously changing and also the edge depends upon the shape of space matrix all around but still as we know dark energy is responsible for expansion so it depends on the behaviour of dark energy as if it obeys the law of conservation of energy then the rate of expansion of the universe would be exactly same everywhere and hence every part would expand in a symmetrical way now if we consider the whole universe as a large system with conserved energy then its orignal shape must be spherical and hence we can say the universe is expanding in spherical symmetry so it will have no edge

  3. amistre64
    • 2 years ago
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    i kinda have to wonder what defines an "edge" for the universe

  4. Sidhantb5
    • 2 years ago
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    if multiverse' exist then no universe may have an edge

  5. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1349878917681:dw|

  6. Fathomspace
    • 2 years ago
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    If considering the universe a sphere in totality,then i guess the universe wouldnt have an edge.Just like earth....And any mass in space tries to occupy minimum volume,so i guess the universe is pretty much a sphere.

  7. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    Its not a perfect analogy though, more of a metaphor I think. If the universe was a true sphere then traveling in one direction I would eventually get back to where I started, which I don't believe is the case.

  8. paarth
    • 2 years ago
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    the answer to this question would depend on how you define "universe". if by "universe" u mean the observable universe , then the answer would be a yes . the observable universe is quite understandably expanding (or its edge is moving away) at the speed of light. if you are talking about the complete "universe" (which is not very well defined) , recent experiments have shown that its topography is more or less flat(and which implies it is endlessly extending). moreover, you may involve the concept of multiverses which will make the topic even less specific and less answerable. so, all in all it depends on what you mean by the term "universe"

  9. Sidhantb5
    • 2 years ago
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    paarth what do we mean by complete universe? is it a multiverse?

  10. paarth
    • 2 years ago
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    that's what i said. it is not defined and, probably, will never be. so for all practical purposes ( which won't be very much practical in the present or the near future)we can use the observable universe which, yes, does have an edge expanding at the speed of light.

  11. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    No.

  12. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    universe have an edge as its just asystem having limited energy.

  13. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @009infinity how are you defining 'edge?'

  14. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    it is expanding till now but its edge is expanding with a constant rate.

  15. ujjwal
    • 2 years ago
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    If universe began from a point and immediately after big-bang began to expand and is expanding, it must have an edge.. Saying that something which 'doesn't have edge' is expanding doesn't make sense at all.. So. if you say the universe is expanding you must say that it has an edge which is expanding along with its expansion! But that's too classical and simple explanation.. maybe it isn't that simple.. but that's what i think!

  16. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @009 you mean the edge of the observable universe, the light horizon, not the actual universe itself.

  17. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @ujjwal that misconception comes from thinking that the universe is expanding into empty space, but all space (empty or not) is within the universe.

  18. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    its ur misconception @CliffSedge as energy creates space and time and definetly space is within the universe.

  19. ujjwal
    • 2 years ago
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    So, how is the universe expanding? Expanding refers to gradual increase in size.. If it doesn't have a size, how can its size increase?

  20. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    let me give you a hint our universe have boundaries proved by holographic principle, so this boundary can store information on its walls

  21. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @009 how is that my misconception? You didn't say anything that is in disagreement with what I said.

  22. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @rv, that is still not a physical boundary. These 'walls' you speak of don't exist anywhere.

  23. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    oh sory!

  24. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    the way I was told to imagine it is a balloon. imagine the 2d surface of the baloon is our 3d space. as the balloon is inflated that 2d surface expands, but still has no edge

  25. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @ujjwal "So, how is the universe expanding? Expanding refers to gradual increase in size.. If it doesn't have a size, how can its size increase?" The expansion is the increase in distance between galaxies. The Big Bang did not occur at a point and then a small universe got bigger. The Big Bang occurred everywhere at the same time. The universe is either infinite or finite (this is unknown, my guess is finite). What ever its finitude at the time of the Big Bang, it is the same now. Expansion occurs everywhere equally.

  26. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @JamesWolf yes, that can help visualize details of the expansion, but since people can't visualize expanding 4-dimensional spacetime, it can be a misleading analogy.

  27. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    Its a really hard one to visualise. Like trying to imagine viewing all of 4d space at once. rather than just 3d spaces with slices of the 4th dimension (time).

  28. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    this is a fact that our universe have boundaries. on which it can store the information the most basic physics principle that information can never be lost e.g., if a star dies it must leave some information in the universe as a residue, where does this information goes is the boundaries of the universe so whats ur ans now?

  29. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1349890021663:dw|

  30. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    My answer is that I dont understand the holographic principle well enough to comment.

  31. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    bloody good drawing considering the shocking software on here

  32. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    its some what like that time is 4th dimension

  33. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @rvgupta I do understand the holographic principle, but you are still imagining that there is a physical wall somewhere that encodes information on a 2D surface. I recommend studying the topic further. Leonard Suskind has some good explanations. It is related to black hole physics as well, so spend some time with that.

  34. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    "if a star dies it must leave some information in the universe as a residue, where does this information goes is the boundaries of the universe" When a start dies, its 'information' is in the form of the matter that it was made of, that matter still resides in the space the star was in.

  35. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    if u people r talking about expansion then let me tell u that it depends on the latest theory INFLATION which predicts that universe expansion rate is continuously increasing even faster than the speed of light so its impossible to say that whether our universe is finite or infinite

  36. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    That is NOT the theory of inflation

  37. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    so what do u think

  38. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    Some casual reading: http://io9.com/5818008/the-universe-probably-isnt-a-giant-hologram-after-all

  39. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @rvgupta (leaving aside your rude tone for now) "if u people r talking about expansion then let me tell u that it depends on the latest theory INFLATION which predicts that universe expansion rate is continuously increasing even faster than the speed of light so its impossible to say that whether our universe is finite or infinite" This is false. Inflation theory isn't a prediction, it is a model of cosmic dynamics shortly after BB. The increase in expansion rate now is unrelated. No matter travels faster than light, but the space between matter can expand at any rate. You are correct that it is not yet known whether the universe is finite or infinite, but regardless of which, there is still no boundary.

  40. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    Some more casual reading: http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/seuforum/faq.htm#s1

  41. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    so what about the information lost

  42. ujjwal
    • 2 years ago
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    What does "information" refer to? @rvgupta

  43. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    what information loss? when a star explodes the information is taken from all the parts that fly off isnt it? if time is reversed you get the star back. no information is lost?

  44. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    it is the most basic principle of physics that information can never be lost so it must be somewhere based on this susskind said that our universe must have boundaries to store this information, even stephen hawkink said that it should be right

  45. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    I dont think you understand it, (im not saying i do). explain to me where the information is lost? Hawking showed that information was not lost in a black hole, since a black hole evaporates?

  46. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    what do u think about parallel universe this theory is useless without boundaries

  47. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    Yeah, I'm not seeing the information loss either. Are you talking about black holes?

  48. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    i think information is not lost till we exist to precieve it

  49. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    I don't think you understand 'parallel universes' or multiverse theory either, rvgupta..

  50. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    @CliffSedge can u explain

  51. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    the old does a bear pellet in the woods theory infinity? :P

  52. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @009infinity 'information' (in physics) is not the same as knowledge. Information is due to signals (relative motion or other interactions of matter and energy).

  53. ujjwal
    • 2 years ago
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    I just understood that i understand nothing! Carry on Young Scientists!!

  54. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    The multiverse is not like universes physically stacked on top of each other as if they were sheets of paper. The multiverse is a sum-over-histories of all the possible interactions that could occur in given instances.

  55. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @ujjwal congratulations, you are at least as wise as Socrates! :-)

  56. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    As much as I would love to continue this discussion all day, I have to leave for work in like 5 minutes, so we can pick this up some other time if you are still interested.

  57. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    information will exist before time is over am i right now

  58. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    I don't know what that means, @009infinity "before time is over" ??

  59. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    cliff u r now talking about parallel universe not multiverse

  60. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    The multiverse *is* parallel universes. It's the same thing, @rvgupta

  61. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    @CliffSedge there r two sence of it that inoformation will exist in universe till time exist (before big crunch)& second its too long discussion to over it

  62. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    "@ujjwal congratulations, you are at least as wise as Socrates! :-)" The oracle would like you :)

  63. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    parallel universes are supported by string theory so dont say that they r same

  64. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @009infinity "there r two sence of it that inoformation will exist in universe till time exist (before big crunch)& second its too long discussion to over it" There is no 'Big Crunch.' The universe will likely go on expanding forever and time will not end.

  65. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes, @rvgupta I understand the inflationary model. It does not support anything you are saying about boundaries. Regardless of what String Theory (a theory that makes no predictions, explains nothing, and has not been tested) says about parallel universes, that has nothing to do with parallel universes and the multiverse meaning the same thing. You are profoundly confused; please do some more studying on the matter.

  66. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    is there any evidience for that @CliffSedge

  67. Fellowroot
    • 2 years ago
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    The universe can be thought of as a sphere expanding in all directions with the passage of time. Because of inflation, the universe was able to expand faster than the speed of light. When we look out into the universe you would think that we would be able to find an edge, but we can't because the universe is bigger than the range in which we can see. Because light is finite we can only see so far out into the universe, the reason why we can't past this is because light hasn't had enough time to reach us yet. Then there are other ideas about the universe being a multiverse and pocket universes, but that's another story.

  68. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @009infinity Yes.

  69. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_flow is an interesting mystery regarding the "uniformity" created during the inflation period.

  70. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    cliff do u want to say that im a fool

  71. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    but i also have who will prove first u or i @CliffSedge

  72. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    I'm sorry, I provided a bad link to a David Deutch article. I still recommend his book, The Beginning of Infinity.

  73. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    ''that is created must be destroyed" here is the proof

  74. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    I dont think cliff is calling you a fool. i just dont think we understand these theories. Its easy to just regurgitate what good scientists say but until we get in there and start understanding the equations we really dont know what were talking about

  75. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @rvgupta , I am not interested in discussing whatever words you are trying to put in my mouth.

  76. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @009infinity "''that is created must be destroyed" here is the proof" That is a pithy statement without meaning.

  77. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    so is there any conclusion

  78. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    Conclusion (based on best current science): The universe is finite and without boundary.

  79. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    "Does our universe have an edge? if yes. Explain" No

  80. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    would u people like to discuss it tomorrow

  81. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    Sure though i cant really add much

  82. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    i will surely give u some astonishing proofs

  83. 009infinity
    • 2 years ago
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    i m ready for genune ones ;)

  84. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    so i am ready to give

  85. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    To count as "astonishing proofs' I will need to see observational data confirmed by at least one other independent source, references to peer-reviewed journals, and any theoretical explanations must be annotated with statements of falsifiability, and relevant criticism from professional scientists. Good luck!

  86. JamesWolf
    • 2 years ago
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    setting the bar low then... :P

  87. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @JamesWolf Yes, but ya' know, this is only OpenStudy, nothing serious.

  88. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    what time do u decide to discuss then

  89. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    I don't know. I log on once-in-a-while when I'm not busy with other stuff. If I don't go out later after work, then I might be back on around 02:00 GMT tomorrow.

  90. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    r u ready 2 hours before this time

  91. mayankdevnani
    • 2 years ago
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    good question but answer is no

  92. mayankdevnani
    • 2 years ago
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    @rvgupta

  93. mayankdevnani
    • 2 years ago
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    http://nerdfighteria.info/index.php?title=The_Universe_Has_NO_EDGE!

  94. mayankdevnani
    • 2 years ago
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    ok

  95. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1349953336768:dw|

  96. mayankdevnani
    • 2 years ago
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    no still not

  97. mayankdevnani
    • 2 years ago
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    scroll up and go through the link

  98. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    i have read that all and they can be true but some theories like M theory predicts that our universe is not only the universe and it can have edge however this theory is still unproven

  99. mayankdevnani
    • 2 years ago
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    ok

  100. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    I don't believe in M and String theory. all of that are hocus pocus. It is more toward mathematics and philosophy or pseudoscience rather than physics. If you can't experiment with it, it just a beautiful guess.

  101. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    There is one feature I notice that is generally missing in M and String Theories. It's a kind of scientific integrity, a principle of scientific thought that corresponds to a kind of utter honesty — a kind of leaning over backwards. For example, if you're doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid — not only what you think is right about it; other causes that could possibly explain your results; and things you thought of that you've eliminated by some other experiment, and how they worked — to make sure the other fellow can tell they have been eliminated. Details that could throw doubt on your interpretation must be given, if you know them. You must do the best you can — if you know anything at all wrong, or possibly wrong — to explain it. If you make a theory, for example, and advertise it, or put it out, then you must also put down all the facts that disagree with it, as well as those that agree with it. There is also a more subtle problem. When you have put a lot of ideas together to make an elaborate theory, you want to make sure, when explaining what it fits, that those things it fits are not just the things that gave you the idea for the theory; but that the finished theory makes something else come out right, in addition. In summary, the idea is to try to give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another.

  102. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    That's why I dislike someone who came with a theory that claim something so big yet so little prove. When asked the prove, they say "Oh just believe in me. Because this theory is SOOO beautiful." It's like a religion really. No wonder people have less honour about physics now. M and String theory are not science yet they promote it as is.

  103. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    It is crazy, nonsense, and the wrong direction for physics. It is new version of medieval theology, and I wish to keep string theorists out of physics.

  104. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    The entire mainstream modern physics band waggon has ignored REAL PHYSICSTS for simplicity and understanding what is known for sure, and has gone off in the other direction (magical unexplainable religion) and built up a 10 dimensional superstring model whose conveniently ‘explained’ Calabi-Yau compactification of the unseen 6 dimensions can take 10500 different forms (conveniently explained away as a ‘landscape’ of unobservable parallel universes, from which ours is picked out using the anthropic principle that because we exist, the values of fundamental parameters we observe must be such that they allow our existence).

  105. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    … I do feel strongly that this is nonsense! … I think all this superstring stuff is crazy and is in the wrong direction. … I don’t like it that they’re not calculating anything. I don’t like that they don’t check their ideas. I don’t like that for anything that disagrees with an experiment, they cook up an explanation … All these numbers [particle masses, etc.] … have no explanations in these string theories – absolutely none!’

  106. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    Besides, what is really there in string is not mathematical beauty, rather, it is mathematical ugliness and scientific failure.

  107. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    Moreover, string theory is NOT even wrong because it does not provide any testable predictions. it has nothing statistical to back it up therefore it is not a valid scientific theory, it is non falsifiable as it currently stands, thus it is not even wrong, it's closer to philosophy atm; that to my mind is uncontestable; if you can show me evidence of string theory then I'll change my mind. Thus for someone to make an argument based upon M theory is just stupid.

  108. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    In conclusion: String and M theories are in the same category with intelligent design, religion, philosophy. They are in a basket or branch of CRAZY department.

  109. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    the universe has an edge like a cloud , the universe is where all the energy and matter exist, at the 'edge' is where there concentration of energy and matter diminishes to zero this is a fuzzy boundary

  110. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1349962712340:dw|

  111. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    it somewhat depends on the shape of the universe whether its shape is spherical and like slices of breads proposed by some scientists

  112. rvgupta
    • 2 years ago
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    you can be right

  113. CliffSedge
    • 2 years ago
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    @twitter , I love you.

  114. twitter
    • 2 years ago
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    Hey man love you too. screw string theory. It degrades physics.

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