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sara12345 Group Title

whats the difference among convex lens, telescope, and optical microscope working principle wise

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. theEric Group Title
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    This is my unprofessional analysis. A convex lens is one piece that is shaped like a center piece of a bulging disk - like flying saucer shape - that will allow some light to pass through it while changing it's direction (of propagation). |dw:1349901617220:dw|

    • one year ago
  2. theEric Group Title
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    Actually, I worded that really badly. It changes the direction of light as it passes from one substance to another.

    • one year ago
  3. theEric Group Title
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    Optic microscopes and telescopes can use different lenses to bend light to recreate an image to a different scale. Both devices are made for the purpose of ceating an image in a greater scale, but sometimes I turn telescopes around because it's funny to see everything tiny!

    • one year ago
  4. theEric Group Title
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    I'm not completely sure if what I said about optic microscopes and telescopes is correct.

    • one year ago
  5. sara12345 Group Title
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    ah it makes sense :) so basically all these use lenses to magnify ? basic concept is same in all these.. ? could u plz tell hw bending light scales the image..

    • one year ago
  6. theEric Group Title
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    http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/telescope-basic.jpg that's a good picture of a telescope http://images.tutorvista.com/content/optical-instruments/compound-microscope.jpeg - that's a confusing picture of a microscope!

    • one year ago
  7. theEric Group Title
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    And telescopes generally don't make the image bigger than the real thing, but they do make it bigger tha you see otherwise.

    • one year ago
  8. sara12345 Group Title
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    convex lens focuses the light into one spot

    • one year ago
  9. sara12345 Group Title
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    but it wont disturb the object is it

    • one year ago
  10. sara12345 Group Title
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    i mean the bending of light

    • one year ago
  11. theEric Group Title
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    And light bends when it changes mediums. It's subtle, like reflection. However, the extend to which it bends depends on the material it's coming from compared to the material it's going into.

    • one year ago
  12. theEric Group Title
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    http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/refraction/index.html - is an application that shows light bending. You can use this if you want.

    • one year ago
  13. sara12345 Group Title
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    wil the resolution of object change, as the eyepiece collects it ?

    • one year ago
  14. sara12345 Group Title
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    in computer if we zoom in the resolution decreases

    • one year ago
  15. theEric Group Title
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    Define resolution, please.

    • one year ago
  16. sara12345 Group Title
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    its downloading java

    • one year ago
  17. theEric Group Title
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    The new image will not necessarily be sharp.

    • one year ago
  18. sara12345 Group Title
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    if i take a pic with 5 MP camera, and keep zooming in the picture would get blurred

    • one year ago
  19. sara12345 Group Title
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    eventhough it becomes big

    • one year ago
  20. theEric Group Title
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    Sorry I'm not being too helpful! I'm having trouble remembering back to when I studied this!

    • one year ago
  21. sara12345 Group Title
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    yes would that happen wid lens also

    • one year ago
  22. theEric Group Title
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    Ah, I see! I like Java... Anyway, that bending of light depends on the angle that it hits the lens! (Angle between lens and propagation of light). That's why the lens's curve is important. Let's draw.

    • one year ago
  23. theEric Group Title
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    |dw:1349924881877:dw|

    • one year ago
  24. sara12345 Group Title
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    ok

    • one year ago
  25. theEric Group Title
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    I'm sorry, there seems to be a lag. I hope my response comes in soon.

    • one year ago
  26. theEric Group Title
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    I'll try to paraphrase. Maybe I type too much.

    • one year ago
  27. theEric Group Title
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    The magnitude of the light bend depends on the medium it comes from and the medium it goes into.

    • one year ago
  28. theEric Group Title
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    It also depends on what angle it hits the surface of what it goes into.

    • one year ago
  29. theEric Group Title
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    That is, the angle between the light's direction of propagation and the surface of the medium.

    • one year ago
  30. theEric Group Title
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    This angle issue is actually why the curve of the lens is so important!

    • one year ago
  31. theEric Group Title
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    The way a convex lens is angled, light rays tend to condense on the other side. This is opposite from concave.|dw:1349932610900:dw|

    • one year ago
  32. theEric Group Title
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    The rays there are parallel with each other and perpendicular to... Well, I'm sure you see it - how it is with the lens. I can say perpendicular to the circular cross-section of the lens as I picture it.

    • one year ago
  33. theEric Group Title
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    Now you mentioned disturbing the light of the object. Well each point of an actual object, like a teddy bear, will scatter light in many directions and then hit your convex lens. On the other side, that point looks like it's in many places. Other points on the object will do the same thing where each one will look like it's in many places. This is the blurring. You look at some point on your image, and it is a culmination of different points on the object. They all mix. But if all the scattered rays of a point on an object meet (at what's called a "focal point") at the image, then it doesn't cause the blurring. To get a great picture, you'd want every point on that object to have exactly one point on the image. Unfortunately, the focal points of different parts of your real object might have different focal points in the setup. You'll get a sharp image when you have the image be where many focal points are. In physics classes, you're often asked to find the focal point of an "object". This object is really just considered to be a point. This scenario demonstrates the actually physics of the light from that point. You can also estimate the focal point of an actual object, but estimations will be closer with smaller objects, greater distances, and other things I think.

    • one year ago
  34. sara12345 Group Title
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    oh if the object is not a single point, then it wont have one focal point, it wil have so many focal points, each for each point on the object is it ! wow

    • one year ago
  35. sara12345 Group Title
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    |dw:1349935517465:dw|

    • one year ago
  36. sara12345 Group Title
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    but hw can light reflected from the object hit the lens only parallely ? it looks the object reflects light in all directions rigth

    • one year ago
  37. sara12345 Group Title
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    |dw:1349935662419:dw|

    • one year ago
  38. sara12345 Group Title
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    @theEric im really understanding these things, u explained ver well, really appreciate ur time :)

    • one year ago
  39. theEric Group Title
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    I'm glad you're learning! I'm doing my best! :P Really, you're absolutely right; light is scattered in all directions! So the rays won't be parallel with each other. The closest thing to rays from one point actually being parallel, is when rays from one point are pretty close to bing parallel. |dw:1349990309151:dw| A good comparison is light coming from the sun. |dw:1349991283091:dw|Now look at the next picture. The point will be a spot on the earth, which is much smaller that the Sun. The sun's so far away, I can fit Sun and Earth in one picture. If I did fit them (in a bigger picture), the Earth would be smaller than a pixel anyway. |dw:1349990936475:dw| See how parallel all rays are? This happens to a lesser extent with all far away object that create or reflect light. So telescopes are simpler to understand when you simplify reality. But microscopes take in light of all directions, and your issue comes up there! The trick, then, is to "focus the microscope" by adjusting the light so that you can get as many points on your object focused to just one point. Thus, no blurring! Later, if I'm free, I'll draw a picture of an object and light rays reflected in different directions from each. Each point's rays will have their own focal point. Thus the image will have just one point shown for that actual point. All points on the object will have a focal point, but those focal points of all the objects points might be hard to catch on a single sheet of paper, or whatever device you use to "catch" the image. If a point from the object isn't focused, then it's spread upon the image and causes blurring. By point, here, I'm actually reffering to a collection of incredibly tiny, subatomic areas that light comes from. But "point" is easier to imagine. Sorry if I've caused any confusion!

    • one year ago
  40. theEric Group Title
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    |dw:1349998593093:dw|

    • one year ago
  41. theEric Group Title
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    red lines are from one point and black lines are from the other. See how each point has it's corresponding point? In reality, that doesn't even always happen because of the lens shape. And different wavelengths, or types of light, don't all bend at the same angle - even when they hit at the same point and angle as other types. But when you get close to the point where rays meet (or get close to one another) then your image will be more in focus.

    • one year ago
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