UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
\[\infty\times0=\]
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
0!!!!
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
@lgbasallote
anonymous
  • anonymous
0

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anonymous
  • anonymous
definitely \(\pi\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
@satellite73 IKR
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
what is your evidence @satellite73
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh wait, i am wrong it is \(e^2\) sorry
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
you can rewrite \[\infty \times 0\] as \[\infty \times \frac 1\infty\] right? then it becomes l'hospital...
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
assuming of course these are functions...
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
there is another way
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
really? hmm
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
change infinity to 1/0 to make it 0/0?
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
either way...it's indeterminate....
anonymous
  • anonymous
if this is a serious question, presumably it is about limits, i.e. if \(\lim_{x\to\infty}f(x)=\infty\) and \(\lim_{x\to \infty}g(x)=0\) then what is \[\lim_{x\to \infty}f(x)g(x)\] the answer is it could be anything, it depends on \(f\) and \(g\) the form is not determined
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\large a \times b = c\] \[\large a=\frac{c}{b}\] \[\large b=\frac{c}{a}\] Let a = ∞, b=0 \[\large ∞=\frac{c}{0}\] \[\large 0=\frac{c}{∞}\] But c/0 is undefined and so is c/∞, right? What if c were positive? What if c were negative?
anonymous
  • anonymous
so it could be \(\pi\) or it could be \(e^2\) or it could be anything
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
an interesting question though is... \[\frac 1 \infty = 0\] therefore... \[0 \times \infty = 1\] that should be right?
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
just expressing how weird math is
anonymous
  • anonymous
not at all
anonymous
  • anonymous
infinity is not a number, and so \(\frac{1}{\infty}\) is not a number either
anonymous
  • anonymous
Agree with @satellite73 To say that 1/∞ = 0, you have to take the limit of 1/x as x-->∞ and then 0 × (x is really really big) still equals 0.
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
|dw:1349968485543:dw|
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
math is still weird....
anonymous
  • anonymous
(I'm going to have to go get coffee, then come back for this. Unkle is about to get all Twilight Zone on us, I can feel it.)
anonymous
  • anonymous
you are making short cut statements about limits namely if \[\lim_{x\to\infty}f(x)=\infty\] then \[\lim_{x\to \infty}\frac{1}{f(x)}=0\]
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
i never really understood the function of limits...
lgbasallote
  • lgbasallote
math is too ambiguous for me
anonymous
  • anonymous
\(\infty\) is not a number \(\infty\times 0\) is not a number \[\frac{5}{\infty}\] is not a number
anonymous
  • anonymous
(aside: Anybody hear the full treatment of 'Hilbert's Hotel?')
anonymous
  • anonymous
Is the slope of the vertical line +∞ or -∞ @UnkleRhaukus ?
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
i dont know what 'Hilbert's Hotel?' is
anonymous
  • anonymous
Check it out some time. David Deutsch gives a good telling of it in his book, 'The Beginning of Infinity.' (Fantastic book on the philosophy of science; I recommend it to everyone.)
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
the product of the slopes of perpendicular lines is
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes, but what is the slope of the vertical line?
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
\[\pm\infty\]
helder_edwin
  • helder_edwin
this might help
1 Attachment
anonymous
  • anonymous
infinity is stupid. \[\infty + 1 = \infty \] \[1 = \infty - \infty = 0\]
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
\[\infty\times 0=-1\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
all the even numbers = \[\infty\] which is smaller than all the numbers = \[\infty\] so \[\infty < \infty\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\large 2 \times ∞ \times 0 = -2?\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
@JamesWolf there are different cardinalities of infinity. Research "Aleph Numbers" for more info. The infinity of integers is less than the infinity of real numbers, etc.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The bastardization of mathematics that has taken place in this thread is like salt rubbed into a fresh wound of my soul. Is there a legitimate question, or are you guys just playing around? :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
this is definitely an undefined case because any number multiplied with zero become zero and any number multiplied with infinity become infinity that's why both of these cases are possible here therefore we cannot consider one these case separately. thus this is an undefined case.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Jemurray3 I don't think there's anything serious going on. Unkle came up with a cute link to slopes of parallel lines, but made the error in saying that vertical lines have a slope, m=∞, which, of course, is false.
anonymous
  • anonymous
if the question is something like lim x->inf of 0*x then it is 0 otherwise we should be more specific about the problem i guess

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