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chloecv1

  • 2 years ago

1/10k-1/15=-1/6

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  1. chloecv1
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1350007681277:dw|

  2. viniterranova
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1350009040313:dw|

  3. .Sam.
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1350019006255:dw|

  4. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    I hate questions like this because you don't know if the k is in the numerator or the denominator.

  5. Kelamun
    • 2 years ago
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    If the k is out in front of the fraction then it is in the numerator.

  6. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    Not exactly true. It could also be \[\frac{1}{10k}-\frac{1}{15}=-\frac{1}{6}\] The only way to truly avoid the confusion is to use parentheses: (1/10)*k-1/15=-1/6

  7. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    There's little reason to argue about this. The ambiguity is clearly present and I have run into similar situations in the past. Sometimes the variable is in the denominator, sometimes in the numerator. The only way to avoid the ambiguity is to use proper parentheses when posting a fraction linearly.

  8. Kelamun
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\frac{1}{10}k-\frac{1}{15}=-\frac{1}{6}\] is equivalent to \[\frac{1}{10}*\frac{k}{1}-\frac{1}{15}=-\frac{1}{6}\]

  9. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    If @chloecv1 had posted the fractions vertically, then it would be more obvious. But she posted it LINEARLY. Do you get what I am saying are will you continue to deny the ambiguity?

  10. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    You seem to be denying the possibility that if someone posts 1/10k-1/15=-1/6, then there's no way the k would be in the denominator.

  11. Kelamun
    • 2 years ago
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    Her linearly written picture looked much more like the k was on the outside, and therefore in the numerator. I do understand the ambiguity of her horizontal post.

  12. Kelamun
    • 2 years ago
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    *vertically written picture.

  13. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    "looks more like" isn't the same as actuality. "looks like" in your case is the equivalent of making an assumption.

  14. Kelamun
    • 2 years ago
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    In either case, the problem works out in essentially the same manner. I did assume, yes.

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